Stratum - Bitcoin Wiki

wafflepool.com - An auto switching scrypt coin mining pool

WafflePool is a multi-coin (scrypt) mining pool. Point your miner to WafflePool with a Bitcoin address as your username, and we take care of automatically mining the most profitable coin at all times, converting the earnings from each coin into Bitcoins, and paying you out in bitcoins! Mining alt-coins and converting to bitcoin is very often orders of magnitude more valuable than mining Bitcoin directly! No registration, no hassles, just point and start getting paid!
[link]

r/Bitcoin recap - July 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 31st monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in July 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

You can call you a Bitcoiner if you know/can explain these terms...

03/Jan/2009
10 Minutes
10,000 BTC Pizza
2016 Blocks
21 Million
210,000 Blocks
51% Attack
Address
Altcoin
Antonopoulos
Asic
Asic Boost
Base58
Batching
Bech32
Bit
Bitcoin Cash
Bitcoin Improvement Proposal (BIP)
Bitcoin SV
Bitmain
Block
Block height
Block reward
Blockchain
Blockexplorer
Bloom Filter
Brain Wallet
Buidl
Change Address
Child pays for parent (CPFP)
Coinbase (not the exchange)
CoinJoin
Coinmarketcap (CMC)
Colored Coin
Confirmation
Consensus
Custodial Wallet
Craig Wright
David Kleinman
Difficulty
Difficulty adjustment
Difficulty Target
Dogecoin
Dorian Nakamoto
Double spend
Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA)
Ethereum
Faketoshi
Fork
Full Node
Gavin Andresen
Genesis Block
Getting goxed
Halving
Hard Fork
Hardware Wallet
Hash
Hashing
Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) Wallet
Hodl
Hot Wallet
Initial Coin Offering (ICO)
Initial Exchange Offering (IEO)
Ledger
Light Node
Lightning
Litecoin
Locktime
Mainnet
Malleability
Master Private Key
Master Public Key
Master Seed
mBTC
Mempool
Merkle Tree
Mining
Mining Farm
Mining Pool
Mixing
MtGox
Multisig
Nonce
Not your keys,...
Opcode
Orphan block
P2PKH
P2SH
Paper Wallet
Peers
Pieter Wuille
Premining
Private key
Proof of Stake (PoS)
Proof of Work (PoW)
Pruning
Public key
Pump'n'Dump
Replace by Fee (RBF)
Ripemd160
Roger Ver
sat
Satoshi Nakamoto
Schnorr Signatures
Script
Segregated Witness (Segwit)
Sha256
Shitcoin
Sidechain
Signature
Signing
Simplified Payment Verification (SPV)
Smart Contract
Soft Fork
Stratum
Syncing
Testnet
Transaction
Transaction Fees
TransactionId (Txid)
Trezor
User Activated Soft Fork (UASF)
Utxo
Wallet Import Format (WIF)
Watch-Only Address
Whitepaper
List obviously not complete. Suggestions appreciated.
Refs:
https://bitcoin.org/en/developer-glossary https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgo7FCCPuylVk4luP3JAgVw https://www.youtube.com/useaantonop
submitted by PolaT1x to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Documentation - Step by Step Guides - Need Help!

We need help with documentation
  1. We need accurate, up to date, step by step text guides
  2. We need screenshots
  3. and we need Videos!

Proof of Work (POW):
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/6umlqq/how_to_mine_biblepay_on_windows/
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/6ummuj/how_to_mine_biblepay_on_linux/
https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
https://whitewalr.us/2019/solo-mine-biblepay.html
https://www.biblepay.org/mining/
NOTE: Core wallet can only solo mine (there are future plans to add a stratum connector)

DRAFT (Work in Progress)
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup_Windows
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup_Linux

Proof of Distributed Computing (PODC):
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC
https://whitewalr.us/2019/boinc-wcg-join-change-team.html
Old: https://wiki.biblepay.org/Distributed_Computing_2
http://wiki.biblepay.org/Distributed_Computing_Start_Guide
http://wiki.biblepay.org/BOINC_Researcher_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_With_PODC
http://wiki.biblepay.org/Distributed_Computing

DRAFT (Work in Progress):
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup

Proof of Orphan (POOM):
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POOM
https://wiki.biblepay.org/Paying_For_a_POOM_Sponsored_Child
https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-cameroonone-partnership.html
https://whitewalr.us/2019/cameroonone-poom-charity-donation.html

Healing Campaign:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/BiblePay_Healing_Campaign
https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-gsc-healing.html

Dynamic Whale Staking (DWS):
https://forum.biblepay.org/index.php?topic=468.0

DRAFT (Work in Progress)
https://wiki.biblepay.org/DWS_Setup

How to Buy BiblePay coins (Bitcoin, Exchange, Wallet, Sync, Encrypt, Backup)
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg51062536#msg51062536

How to Create Proposals (How to Get Funding)
http://wiki.biblepay.org/Create_Sanctuary_2#SUBMIT_PROPOSAL

Masternode
http://wiki.biblepay.org/Create_Sanctuary_2

Anything missing?

You can get paid BBP coins from our monthly budget for working on this!
https://forum.biblepay.org/index.php?board=5.0

Reference:
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg53424005#msg53424005
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

MVis Explainer: Stratum Protocol

I thought it would be good to post a series of articles explaining some features of my new mining pool, mvis.ca. First off is the Stratum Protocol. But to understand the stratum protocol we first need to understand what came before it, namely, the RPC protocol.

RPC Protocol

RPC stands for Remote Procedure Call. The mining software uses this protocol to continuously poll the mining pool via an HTTP request to see if any of the mining parameters have changed. It is somewhat analogous to kids in the back seat of your car on a long trip, continuously asking “Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?” Gets annoying real quick. Some miners configure their software to poll the mining pool multiple times per second. Obviously, with many miners, this is very inefficient and places a heavy load on the mining pool. In the very early days of cryptocurrency this was how all pools operated, but soon someone came up with something better, namely the Stratum protocol.

Stratum Protocol

The Stratum protocol, on the other hand, avoids continuously polling the pool by establishing a persistent TCP connection with the mining pool. (It’s like phoning someone and keeping the line open.) When the link is first opened the mining pool sends the current mining parameters to the miner. Whenever the mining parameters change, the mining pool simply sends the new values down to the miner on the open TCP link. Very fast. Very efficient. Nobody gets annoyed.
There's only one problem though - most of the software used to mine 0xBTC does not yet support the stratum protocol. The solution is to use a Stratum Proxy

Stratum Proxy

A Stratum Proxy is a program that acts as both a stratum client and an RPC server. You would typically run it alongside your mining software. As a stratum client, it connects up to the pool using the stratum protocol in order to obtain the current mining parameters. As an RPC server, it configures itself to listen on port 8080 in order to serve RPC requests from your mining software. Once you have the proxy running and configured, simply point your miner to http://localhost:8080. The mining software will think it's connected to a regular pool using the RPC protocol. You can read more about the proxy program here.
And that's about it. If you would like to mine at MVIS Mining Pool, please see the faq for detailed mining instructions. There's also a link to some detailed specs on the stratum protocol as implemented on my pool.
submitted by mining-visualizer to 0xbitcoin [link] [comments]

AsicBoost and the strange case of CVE-2017-9230

About CVEs

In the public interest of tracking and remedying cybersecurity vulnerabilities quickly, a public database was created in 2000: the CVE List [1].
CVE stands for Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Its database records, known as CVEs, track and record publicly known cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Each recorded vulnerability has a unique ID and lifecycle where it follows certain states.

The AsicBoost controversy

In April 2017, Greg Maxwell published an email [2] on the bitcoin-dev mailing list which described AsicBoost - a patented optimization to the algorithm used in Bitcoin mining - as an attack on the Bitcoin protocol.
There was much contention [3] about whether AsicBoost constituted some kind of harmful exploit, or whether it was merely a technological innovation which enabled more efficient mining hardware (ASICs).
There were allegations, widely reported in media, that the patent served the interest of Bitmain [4]. The purported benefits of exploiting this patent as alleged by Core developers were contemporaneously disputed by other miners [5].

CVE-2017-9230 raised against AsicBoost

On 18 May 2017, Cameron Garnham posted to the bitcoin-dev list [6], urging for getting a CVE assigned to the perceived vulnerability.
On 24 May 2017, this CVE was created as CVE-2017-9230 [7]. It was simultaneously published under Bugtraq ID 'BID 98657' at [8].
The justification in the CVE stated that the AsicBoost method
'violates the security assumptions of (1) the choice of input, outside of the dedicated nonce area, fed into the Proof-of-Work function should not change its difficulty to evaluate and (2) every Proof-of-Work function execution should be independent.'
It seemed a plausible enough reasoning for the CVE to be assigned. It was entered in the list of Bitcoin-related CVE's at [9]. Detailed information on this particular CVE is still missing/incomplete on the wiki page, a year after the CVE was raised.

What happened since the CVE was raised

If you've followed along, you've learned that the CVE was raised to counter the exploitation of the AsicBoost method by miners.
Since then, however, a Core developer, BtcDrak, has been involved in the founding of a mining company, Halong Mining. Several online sources state his (part?) ownership of this company.
BtcDrak has put forward a proposal [10] which would enable the use of AsicBoost within the Bitcoin Core software (the dominant client software on the BTC network).
This proposal appears to directly contradict the CVE claims of how AsicBoost violates "security assumptions" of Bitcoin, and indeed does not address how it mitigates them, nor is CVE-2017-9230 referenced in any of its related documentation.
While the proposal's specification [11] and implementation [12] have not yet been formally accepted, the situation is that Halong has shipped mining equipment which is now actively employing AsicBoost [13,14] on the Bitcoin (BTC) network. There is even a website showing the blocks where AsicBoost was used [15].

Conflict of interest

There a clear conflict of interest in the actions of the Core developer BtcDrak. His actions as a Core developer appear to be furthering his company's interests and competitive advantage in the mining industry by exploiting a vulnerability of which he must have been keenly aware, having participated on the same bitcoin-dev mailing list where it was discussed.
The CVE was vociferously used to paint Bitmain as culpable for delaying Segwit (Bitmain was accused of using AsicBoost and blocking Segwit activation for their own profit motive - claims that Bitmain has publicly denied strongly and which were never substantiated).
One might have expected a similar outcry against Halong's proven and announced use of AsicBoost, but the parties that had previously condemned Bitmain remained mostly silent. Only an anonymous non-developer, Cobra-Bitcoin, co-owner of the bitcoin.org domain, spoke out on the Github pull request in [11], and Core developer Luke-jr spoke out against the use of the proposal on the Bitcoin network while consensus had not been reached on it [16].
Subsequent discussion on the bitcoin-dev list on this topic since March has been minimal and only concerned with technicalities of stratum protocol changes.

The bigger elephant in the room

It seems logical that either AsicBoost constitutes an exploitable weakness, and thus merits a CVE and measures taken to prevent its use on the Bitcoin network entirely.
Or it is not a problem and the CVE should be invalidated.
The Bitcoin Core project should use its consensus processes to arrive at a coherent decision.

Other problems raised by the use of overt AsicBoost

The Halong implementation uses version rolling of the nversion bits of the header. It reserves a subset of those bits for overt AsicBoost.
These bits are no longer available to BIP9, but there was no update of BIP9 proposed to address this impact.
This is a question of sensible procedures being followed (or not). The author did not find any review comment mentioning the lack of BIP9 specification update, which suggest a lack of thorough review on a proposal which dates back several months.
A minor issue is that the Core implementation warns when a certain proportion of unrecognized version bits are detected. This behavior can be triggered by the AsicBoost method used on the network.
[1] https://cve.mitre.org/about/history.html
[2] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2017-April/013996.html
[3] https://news.bitcoin.com/developers-clash-exploit-secret-core-organization/
[4] https://archive.is/q2Q4t
[5] https://medium.com/@vcorem/the-real-savings-from-asicboost-to-bitmaintech-ff265c2d305b
[6] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2017-May/014349.html
[7] https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2017-9230
[8] https://www.securityfocus.com/bid/98657
[9] https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Common_Vulnerabilities_and_Exposures
[10] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2018-March/015801.html
[11] https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/pull/661
[12] https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/12633
[13] https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/halong-mining-first-bitcoin-mining-hardware-producer-implement-overt-asicboost/
[14] https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/slush-pool-now-compatible-asicboost-miners/
[15] https://asicboost.dance
[16] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2018-March/015802.html
EDITS:
  1. make dates unambiguous, make it clear that [5] disputes the benefits alleged by Core developers
submitted by btcfork to btc [link] [comments]

EasyMine: WTF Happened?

UPDATE: VTC mining on Easymine back to normal, payouts have resumed. Zero fees for the rest of the month.
Here's a more detailed response to https://old.reddit.com/vertcoin/comments/96z77t/psa_easy_mine_problem/ - bear with me and put on your nerd hat for a few mins.
The stratum server for all EasyMine pools is node-merged-pool - a merge mining fork of node-stratum-pool. See my repo here @ https://github.com/nzsquirrell/node-merged-pool
This is what miners connect to for work and to submit valid shares on the search for blocks. The information that is exchanged in hex digits, and the data coming back from the miner includes the time, the job, ExtraNonce2 and nonce (see https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Stratum_mining_protocol#mining.submit). All of these fields are used to notify the server of valid work exceeding a specific difficulty.
Hex digits are not case-sensitive. So 'FF00AA11' is the same as 'ff00aa11'. Both equate to decimal 4278233617. So for the purposes of construction a block header, it doesn't matter if the hex digits are uppercase, lowercase, or a mixture of both - it all works out the same, and produces the same hash. Hold this thought.
The stratum server knows what shares each miner has submitted, it keeps a track of all of the data in an array. It checks every time that work is submitted that the same work hasn't been submitted before whilst searching for the next block. If it was submitted, then the new submission is rejected as duplicate work.
Now, where this has all gone wrong is that the way the data is stored in this array was a string containing the four fields mentioned above. Strings are case-sensitive and when making comparisons 'FF00AA11' != 'ff00aa11', as well as 'ff00aA11' and 'ff00AA11' and so on.... This allowed our attacker to submit the same work many many times, altering only the case of the hex digits (he was doing it to the nonce, but the other fields are also susceptible to the attack), so the logic to check for duplicate work wasn't firing, the shares were valid (as they produced a valid hash above difficulty), and our attacker was faking most of his hash-rate. A lot. A shit-ton of it.
I have fixed this in my fork of node-stratum-pool - the fix is very easy, we just make all the characters lower case before testing for duplicate shares. See https://github.com/nzsquirrell/node-merged-pool/commit/9d068535d042516835f565a859852c7cf715da98 for my fix.
My big concern is that the other forks I've seen for node-stratum-pool are susceptible to the attack, and quite possibly other pool software is too possibly even p2pool? I've not looked. If someone can check and let me know and I'll update this. p2pool has been confirmed as resilient to this type of attack.
So, Who-The-F&*k did this. This is what I have so far:
He's used the following VTC and NIX addresses:
I've seen connections coming in from the following IP addresses:
He is still attacking EasyMine, but it's not having any effect now. Actually the server keeps banning him now as it's detecting that he's submitting too many invalid shares. Take that.
The path forward
I have a big mess to clean up, he's made off with about 652 VTC and about 3576 NIX, essentially stolen from you miners. I will see what I can do to recover some of this (not all of it has been paid to him yet), but there is going to be a substantial shortfall. Mr Attacker, feel free to PM me and we can arrange a settlement :)
Payouts on both the VTC & NIX pools are suspended until i can clean this up, I hope this won't take more than a couple of days.
Thanks.
submitted by nzsquirrell to vertcoin [link] [comments]

such beginner shibe thread wow how to get coin

 how to shibecoin v rich in minutes much instruct so simple any doge can do 

START HERE

UPDATE 1/21/14: I'm not updating this guide anymore. Most of the steps should still work though. See the wiki or check the sidebar for updated instructions.
Before you do anything else, you need to get a wallet. Until there's a secure online wallet, this means you need to download the dogecoin client.
Now open the client you just downloaded. You'll be given a default address automatically, and it should connect to peers and start downloading the dogechain (aka blockchain in formal speak). You'll know because there will be a progress bar at the bottom and at the lower right there should be a signal strength icon (TODO: add screenshots).
If you've waited 2 or 3 minutes and nothing is happening, copy this:
maxconnections=100 addnode=95.85.29.144 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=146.185.181.114 addnode=188.165.19.28 addnode=166.78.155.36 addnode=doge.scryptpools.com addnode=doge.netcodepool.org addnode=doge.pool.webxass.de addnode=doge.cryptopool.it addnode=pool.testserverino.de addnode=doge.luckyminers.com addnode=doge.cryptovalley.com addnode=miner.coinedup.comdoge addnode=doge.cryptoculture.net addnode=dogepool.pw addnode=doge.gentoomen.org addnode=doge.cryptominer.net addnode=67.205.20.10 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=78.46.57.132 
And paste it into a new text file called dogecoin.conf, which you then place into the dogecoin app directory.
Now restart your qt client and the blockchain should start downloading in about 1-2 minutes.
Once it finished downloading, you're ready to send and receive Dogecoins!

GETTING COINS

Decide how you want to get Dogecoin. Your options are:
I'll go into detail about each of these. I'm currently writing this out. I'll make edits as I add sections. Suggestions are welcome.

MINING

Mining is how new dogecoins are created. If you're new to crypto currencies, read this. To mine (also called "digging"), a computer with a decent GPU (graphics card) is recommended. You can also mine with your CPU, but it's not as efficient.

GPU MINING

These instructions cover only Windows for now. To mine, you'll need to figure out what GPU you have. It'll be either AMD/ATI or Nvidia. The setup for both is approximately the same.

Step One: Choose a pool

There's a list of pools on the wiki. For now it doesn't really matter which one you choose. You can easily switch later.
NOTE: You can mine in two ways. Solo mining is where you mine by yourself. When you find a block you get all the reward. Pool mining is when you team up with other miners to work on the same block together. This makes it more likely that you'll find a block, but you won't get all of it, you'll have to split it up with others according to your share of the work. Pool mining is recommended because it gives you frequent payouts, because you find more blocks. The larger the pool you join, the more frequent the payouts, but the smaller the reward you get.
Over a long period of time the difference between pool and solo mining goes away, but if you solo mine it might be months before you get any coins.

Step two: Set up pool account

The pool you chose should have a getting started page. Read it and follow the instructions. Instructions vary but the general idea is:
When you're done with this, you'll need to know:

Step three: Download mining software

For best performance you'll need the right mining software.
Unzip the download anywhere you want.

Step four: Set up miner

Create a text file in the same folder as your miner application. Inside, put the command you'll be running (remove brackets).
For AMD it's cgminer.exe --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://: -u -p
For Nvidia it's cudaminer.exe -o stratum+tcp://: -O :
Substitute the right stuff in for the placeholders. Then on the next line of the text file type pause. This will let you see any errors that you get. Then save the file with any name you want, as long as the file extension is .bat. For example mine_serverName.bat.

Step five: Launch your miner

Just open the .bat file and a command line window should pop up, letting you know that the miner is starting. Once it starts, it should print out your hash rate.
If you now go to the pool website, the dashboard should start showing your hashrate. At first it'll be lower than what it says in the miner, but that's because the dashboard is taking a 5 minute average. It'll catch up soon enough.
NOTE: A normal hashrate is between 50 Kh/s up to even 1 Mh/s depending on your GPU.

You're now mining Dogecoins

That's it, nothing more to it.

CPU MINING

CPU mining isn't really recommended, because you'll be spending a lot on more on power than you'd make from mining Dogecoin. You could better spend that money on buying Dogecoin by trading. But if you have free electricity and want to try it out, check out this informative forum post.

Trading

Trading has been difficult so far, but Dogecoin just got added to a few new exchanges. If you don't have a giant mining rig, this is probably the best way to get 100k or more dogecoins at the moment. I'll write up a more complete guide, but for now check out these sites:

Faucets

Faucets are sites that give out free coins. Usually a site will give out somewhere between 1 and 100 Dogecoin. Every site has its own time limits, but usually you can only receive coins once every few hours, or in some cases, days. It's a great way to get started. All you do is copy your address from the receive section of your wallet and enter it on some faucet sites. Check out /dogecoinfaucets for more. If you go to each site on there you might end up with a couple hundred Dogecoin!

Begging

This method is pretty straightforward. Post your receiving address, and ask for some coins. Such poor shibe. The only catch is, don't do it here! Please go to /dogecoinbeg.

Tips

At the moment there are two tip bots:
Other redditors can give you Dogecoin by summoning the tip bot, something like this:
+dogetipbot 5 doge
This might happen if you make a good post, or someone just wants to give out some coins. Once you receive a tip you have to accept it in a few days or else it'll get returned. Do this by following the instructions on the message you receive in your inbox. You reply to the bot with "+accept". Commands go in the message body. Once you do that, the bot will create a tipping address for you, and you can use the links in the message you receive to see your info, withdraw coins to your dogecoin-qt wallet, see your history, and a bunch of other stuff.
As a bonus, so_doge_tip has a feature where you can get some Dogecoins to start with in exchange for how much karma you have. To do this, send the message "+redeem DOGE" to so_doge_tip. You'll need to create a tipping account if you don't have one.
If you want to create a tipping account without ever being tipped first, message either of the bots with "+register" and an address will be created for you.

CHANGELOG

  • 1/21/14 - Added note about this thread no longer being updated
  • 1/21/14 - Changed wallet links to official site
  • 12/27/13 - Added 1.3 wallet-qt links
  • 12/21/13 - Added new windows 1.2 wallet link
  • 12/20/13 - Fixed +redeem text
  • 12/18/13 - Added short blurb on trading.
  • 12/18/13 - Updated cudaminer to new version (cudaminer-2013-12-18.zip).
  • 12/18/13 - Fixed +redeem link
  • 12/18/13 - Updates dogecoin.conf, from here.
  • 12/17/13 - Linked to mining explanation.
  • 12/17/13 - Added link to CPU mining tutorial, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added links to tip commands, link to dogetipbot wiki.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about tip commands going in body, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added link to cgminer mirror, thanks to scubasteve812 and thanks to Bagrisham.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about removing brackets in response to this.
  • 12/15/13 - Fixed hash rate as per this comment, thanks lleti
  • 12/15/13 - Added info for all other ways of getting money, except for trading (placeholder for now)
  • 12/15/13 - Added windows GPU mining instructions 12/15/13 - Added wallet instructions, list of how to get money
submitted by lego-banana to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Zoin Basics: A Beginner’s Guide to Obtaining Zoin

Welcome to Zoin! We want to start by thanking you for joining our amazing community. Zoin is a community-governed decentralized digital currency with privacy features (based on the Zerocoin protocol) and is developed by a diverse team from all around the world. There is no pre-mine and no founder’s reward for Zoin; additionally, it is strictly CPU-minable (see mining section below). Together, these features ensure fairness and transparency to everyone interested in obtaining Zoin. Through this guide you will learn about the current methods of acquiring Zoin for yourself.

How to Earn / Buy Zoin

Right now, there are two ways you can obtain Zoin. You can either use the Bitcoin/Zoin trading pair on Cryptopia exchange or you can mine for Zoin using your own hardware.
 

Method 1: Trading Zoin on Cryptopia

To start, the easiest way to buy a cryptocurrency such as Ethereum or Litecoin is through Coinbase, where you can buy up to $500 worth of Litecoins (for example) using a credit card before you need to verify your identity. Coinbase accepts buyers from 33 countries across the world. A simple guide from Coinbase on buying Litecoin (or Ethereum) with your bank account / credit card is all you need to get started.
Once you have purchased either Litecoin or Ethereum (or another altcoin) you may login to Cryptopia exchange, after you’ve created an account. You must create a deposit address for the same coin that you previously bought on Coinbase or another exchange by clicking deposit under your account, and then typing the name of the coin you wish to deposit. This will generate an address for your Cryptopia trading wallet to receive coins. You can either copy / paste the address (never type it yourself without verifying it), or scan the QR code if you are sending from a mobile wallet.
Once you make a deposit to your Cryptopia wallet address you must wait for several confirmations before your funds are trade-able on Cryptopia. This usually takes around 30 minutes.
When the deposit is confirmed you may go to the Exchange Market section of Cryptopia and search for the coin you just deposited. Once you are there, create a sell order and wait for someone to buy it, or choose a buy order for the coin to trade it for Bitcoin right away. Since you just purchased your cryptocurrency, the price probably won’t be very different than when you bought it, but this depends heavily on the current state of the market. Look up how much the current buy orders are (in your country’s currency), if it is close to the price you bought it at then you can sell at that price. Remember, a sell order may not be filled right away, but choosing someone’s buy order will sell it to them instantly.
If you have successfully traded your altcoin for Bitcoin on Cryptopia, you may now use your Bitcoin to buy Zoin. You can buy Zoin through a buy order of your own (bid) or a sell order from someone else; again, this is entirely up to you and how you anticipate the market / price of coins.
Congratulations, you have successfully bought your first Zoin!
The next step is to transfer the Zoin you bought to your own personal Zoin wallet. To do this, download the wallet on your preferred platform and after installing and running the wallet for the first time, wait for the blockchain to fully sync.
 
  1. Close your wallet (if it’s open).
  2. Delete the following folders from %appdata% on Windows or Library/Application Support/Zoin on Mac: Blocks, Chainstate and the file peers.dat
  3. Download the latest blockchain file, extract using 7Zip or your preferred program.
  4. Paste the newly downloaded folders: Block, Chainstate and file peers.dat in ZOIN folder under %appdata% on Windows or Library/Application Support/Zoin on Mac
  5. Open the wallet and wait for it to synchronize. This should take less time than downloading the entire blockchain and syncing from scratch. The process should take around 30 minutes.
Go to the Receive tab and click on your address, then choose Copy Address. Paste that address on the Cryptopia withdraw page for Zoin and confirm that you want to withdraw. In a few minutes, your Zoin will show up in your wallet (it will be confirmed after 6 confirmations).
 
After your wallet is up to date and you’ve added some of your coins to it, you will want to make it safe in case something happens.
The first thing you want to do is to encrypt it. You can do this by clicking on Settings Encrypt Wallet
You should type in a passphrase that is safe and that you will remember, confirm this passphrase and proceed to encrypt your wallet.
Please be advised, once you set your passphrase you can’t forget it or all your funds will be lost!
Right after your wallet has been encrypted, you should make a backup of it. Click on File Backup Wallet and save the wallet as a wallet.dat file
If you want to open your wallet on another computer you may save the wallet file onto a flash drive or other backup device / method you may already have. Remember that if you encrypted your wallet before doing this backup you must know the passphrase in order to access your wallet.
 
Another way of recovering your wallet is by finding the private key for the wallet. This can be done in the wallet debug terminal (advanced). For accessing your wallet private key, you must do the following procedure:
If your wallet is encrypted: Click Help Debug Window Console (tab). In the console window, use the command walletpassphrase first:
walletpassphrase "YourPassphrase" 60 
Where "YourPassphrase" is the passphrase you used when you encrypted your wallet and 60 is the amount of time you want to unencrypt your wallet for (in seconds).
Next, use the dumpprivkey command in the following form:
dumpprivkey "wallet address" 
Replace "wallet address" with your own wallet address.
After entering these commands, you will receive your private key.
You may now write down and save this private key.
 

Method 2: Mining Zoin

The second way of obtaining Zoin is to earn it by mining, using your own hardware and a mining pool server (we recommend the official pool). Mining Zoin is possible with any modern computer as long as it has a CPU.
To start mining you need to have an account in a “pool”; this is a place where several computers (also known as workers) connect together to mine the blockchain. As we mine the blockchain, we find blocks which contain a reward (currently 12.5 Zoin) which is shared by the number of total miners depending on each person’s mining hashrate. The better your hardware is, the more Zoin you will receive from mining.
To get started, visit our official pool and create your mining account.
You will need to set up a worker. This is your mining device which should be assigned a name and password in order for the network to distinguish your mining rig from others. To do this, visit the Workers page.
The Username must be set for as many workers or computers you want to set up. For example, if the username you chose when signing up to our pool was “john123” and you set your first computer name to worker1. Then your username and worker will be: “john123.worker1”. If you set a second worker as worker2, your second worker name will be “john123.worker2” and so on. The password will be whatever you choose under the password that box, the password can be the same for all the workers.
 
Mining on Windows:
Now that your workers are set, you can go ahead and download mining software, which you can get from the Resources page of the official pool.
Once you have the mining software, open the compressed folder by extracting its contents and create a batch (.bat) file which will contain all the info necessary to mine Zoin into your account. To do this, open a text editor such as Notepad and save the file as .bat instead of .txt
 
This batch file must contain just one line:
cpuminer-aes-avx2.exe -a lyra2zoin -o stratum+tcp://zoin.netabuse.net:3000 -u username.workername -p workerpassword 
 
cpuminer-aes-avx2.exe is the .exe file that you want to use, it depends on your CPU.
Lyra2zoin is the algorithm used by Zoin, that should remain the same.
stratum+tcp://zoin.netabuse.net:3000 is the link to the official pool.
username.workername should be the username you set. (Example: john123.worker1)
workerpassword is the password you set for each worker.
Once you set this batch file, you can run it by double-clicking on it.
 
Note: Make sure that your Firewall / AV program isn’t blocking cpuminer-aes-avx2.exe or the .bat file in order for it to run successfully.
 
Mining on Linux (Advanced):
Type the following into the terminal one line at a time:
 
sudo chown -R $USER: $HOME 
 
sudo apt-get update 
 
sudo apt-get install automake autoconf pkg-config libcurl4-openssl-dev libjansson-dev libssl-dev libgmp-dev -y 
 
sudo apt-get install autotools-dev automake make libcurl4-openssl-dev g++ libssl-dev libgmp3-dev -y 
 
sudo apt-get install build-essential screen automake m4 openssl libssl-dev git libjson0 libjson0-dev libcurl4- openssl-dev autoconf python-software-properties -y 
 
sudo git clone https://github.com/JayDDee/cpuminer-opt 
 
cd cpuminer-opt 
 
./build.sh 
 
./cpuminer -a lyra2zoin -o stratum+tcp://zoin.netabuse.net:3000 -u USERNAME.WORKERNAME -p x -t x 
Replace USERNAME.WORKERNAME with your unique pool username and workername
 
Mining on Mac OS:
  1. Download and install Docker Community Edition
  2. Visit the Zoin Official Pool and create your mining account
  3. Setup a Worker
  4. Edit the line below to match your pool configuration:
 
docker run hmage/cpuminer-opt -a lyra2zoin -o stratum+tcp://zoin.netabuse.net:3000 -u USERNAME.WORKERNAME -p x 
 
hmage/cpuminer-opt is the miner that will be used by docker.
Lyra2zoin is the algorithm used by Zoin, that should remain the same.
stratum+tcp://zoin.netabuse.net:3000 is the link to the official pool.
USERNAME.WORKERNAME should be your unique username and workname (Example: john123.worker1)
If Docker up and running, open Terminal on your Mac (Command + Spacebar and type "Terminal") and paste the line you created. Docker will proceed to download the necessary programs and start mining right away. If you can see the Accepted green message you are mining and you can check all of the mining stats and your earnings from the pool on the main page.
Happy mining!
submitted by Bluish91 to zoinofficial [link] [comments]

SOLO Mining setup instructions. CCminer Nevermore and QT / CLI wallet.

First, I do not solo mine myself, so I can not confirm if this setup pays. I do not have the hash to even consider trying. I can confirm ccminer gets work from the wallet and cards get hot. Enjoy!
 
EDIT: Setup tested on coin with lower difficulty. I got paid.
 
 
 
rpcuser=user rpcpassword=pass rpcbind=192.168.1.100:8766 rpcallowip=192.168.1.1/24 server=1 
 
Replace user, pass and ips to match your setup. You can make up your own usepass. You need to use the same ones when configuring ccminer. 192.168.1.100 needs to be changed to the IP of the machine running the wallet. This setup allows connections from all ips in the range 192.168.1.X
 
 
:mine ccminer.exe -a x16r -o http://192.168.1.100:8766 -u user -p pass -i 21 --no-longpoll --no-getwork --no-stratum --coinbase-addr=YOUR_RVN_ADDRESS_HERE ping -n 30 127.0.0.1 goto :mine 
 
Replace user, pass and IP to match your setup. The IP is to the machine running the wallet and the usepass are the ones you set in the first config file. And don't forget to add your RVN-address.
 
 
If you found this useful any donation would be welcome RVN: RFmtFb9GdZHvbvBW5hYB3s9VezJxeSfnz3  
   
 
#!/bin/bash until /path/to/ccminer -a x16r -o http://192.168.1.100:8766 -u user -p pass -i 21 --no-longpoll --no-getwork --no-stratum --coinbase-addr=YOUR_RVN_ADDRESS_HERE; do ping -c 30 127.0.0.1 done 
 
Replace user, pass and IP to match your setup. The IP is to the machine running the wallet and the usepass are the ones you set in the first config file. And don't forget to add your RVN-address.
 
 
 
If you found this useful any donation would be welcome RVN: RFmtFb9GdZHvbvBW5hYB3s9VezJxeSfnz3
    
Found errors or got suggestions? - please leave a comment or send me a message.
 
Useful links:   https://github.com/brian112358/nevermore-minereleases https://github.com/brian112358/nevermore-minewiki/Solo-mining https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/118/how-much-bitcoin-will-i-mine-right-now-with-hardware-x https://rvnstats.info/
submitted by fdoving to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

TERA CRYPTO CURRENCY PROJECT

TERA is an open source and collaborative project. It means everyone can view and eventually modify its source code for hehis own needs. And it also means anyone is welcome to integrate its working community. The Tera community works to develop, deploy and maintain Tera nodes and decentralized applications that are part of the TERA Network.
The TERA technology serves the cryptocurrency concepts, trying to design a modern coins and contracts blockchain application : fast block generation, high transaction throughput and user-friendly application. It was officialy launched on 30th of June 2018 on the bitcointalk forum.
[Yuriy Ivanov](mailto:[email protected]) is the founder and core developer of the project. The Tera community is more familiar with the alias « vtools ».

USER FRIENDLY APPLICATION

In the aim to make this crypto currency project more friendly to end-users, some interesting innovations have been implemented in regards to the first generation of crpyto currency applications. The bitcoin and its thousands of child or fork, required a good level of IT skills in order to manage all the application chain from its own : from miners and its hardware, through stratum servers, proxies, to blockchain nodes. The Tera project intend to go one step further regarding crypto currency features integration into a single application : once installed, an efficient web application is available on localhost on port 8080. Then, any web browser supporting javascript may be able to access this application and to operate fully the Tera node.

MINING A CRYPTO CURRENCY

MINING CONCEPT

The mining activity consist in calling a mathematical procedure we can’t predict the result before we run it. But we intend to obtain a very specific result, which usually consist in a certain number of 0 as the first chars before any random answer. If we found the nonce (a random object) combined with the transaction data and the coin algorithm that produce such result, we’ll have solve a transaction block and we’ll get a reward for that. Thanks to this work, the transaction listed in the block will be added to the blockchain and anyone will be able to check our work. That’s the concept of ‘proof of work’ allowing anyone to replay the mathematical procedure with the nonce discovered by the node that solved the block and to confirm block inclusion into the blockchain.

POLITICAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS

The Tera project is young. It will have to face the same problems is facing today the Bitcoin platform :
Any Crypto Currency Project with the goal its money and contracts to be used as any other historical money or service contract has to consider its political and ethical usage. Processes have to be imagined, designed and implemented in order to be able to fight against extortion, corruption and illegal activities threating crypto-currency development.

FAST BLOCK GENERATION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT

CLASSIC CRYPTO CURRENCY FEATURES

wallet, accounts, payments, mining, node settings and utilities, blockchain explorer and utilities…

DECENTRALIZED APP CATALOGUE

d-app : forum, stock exchange, payment plugins for third party platform, …

TECHNOLOGY DEPENDENCIES

Tera is entirely written in Java) over the NodeJS library as functional layer in order to take advantages of a robust and high level library designed to allow large and effective network node management.
The miner part is imported from an external repository and is written in C in order to get the best performances for this module.
Tera is actually officially supported on Linux and Windows.
If you start mining Tera thanks to this article, you can add my account 188131 as advisor to yours. On simple demand I’ll refund you half of the extra coins generated for advisors when you’ll solve blocks (@freddy#8516 on discord).

MINING TERA

Mining Tera has one major design constraint : you need one public IP per Tera node or miner. Yet, you can easily mine it on a computer desktop at home. The mining algorithm has been designed in order to be GPU resistant. In order to mine Tera coin you’ll need a multi-core processor (2 minimum) and some RAM, between 1 and 4GB per process that will mine. The mining reward level depends of the « power » used to solve a block (Top Tera Miners).

COST AND USAGE CONSIDERATIONS

There is two main cost centers in order to mine a crypto currency :
  1. the cost of the hardware and the energy required to make a huge amount of mathematical operations connected to the blockchain network through the Internet,
  2. the human cost in order to deploy, maintain and keep running miners and blockchain nodes.
As the speculation actually drives the value of crypto currencies, it is not possible to answer if the mining activity is profitable or not. Moreover, hardware, energy and human costs are not the same around the globe. To appreciate if mining a crypto currency is profitable we should take all indirect costs : nature cost (for hardware and energy production), human cost (coins and contracts usage, social rights of blockchain workers).

Original: https://freddy.linuxtribe.frecherche-et-developpement/blockchain-cryptocurrency-mining/tera-crypto-currency-project/
Author: Freddy Frouin, [email protected].
submitted by Terafoundation to u/Terafoundation [link] [comments]

Making pooled mining immune to 51% attacks, selfish mining, etc. by bundling an SPV client into mining software.

This idea has been floating in my mind for a while, but I haven't seen anyone else mention it. Figured it was worth discussing.

The problem

The threat posed by pools is that they indirectly control large amounts of hashing power. Miners are mining blindly on whatever header the pool gives them, and hence can be made to attack the network at their leisure.

GetBlockTemplate

GetBlockTemplate was supposed to fix this problem by allowing miners to do their own transactions (and making what they're mining completely transparent). This works, but adoption is low for a few reasons:
TLDR: GBT is a great way to neuter the ability of pools to do bad things™, but it isn't widely deployed due to the resource requirements and setup effort of using it properly.
Most/All the big threats posed by a large pool boil down to:
In both cases, the fact that this is occuring is actually detectable regardless of mining protocol (getwork,stratum,GBT), because the parent block hash is part of the header the miner is hashing. So the information you need to know whether you're being used to attack the network has been available all along.

The suggestion

By bundling an SPV client into mining software, all miners can verify that they're building on top of a block that is:
  1. Known to the network (blocking selfish mining).
  2. The tip of the longest chain (blocking orphaning of other blocks/51% attacks).
If this isn't the case, they can switch to their backup pool.

Advantages of the approach:

Disadvantages:

Does this work, or am I missing something obvious?
submitted by ninja_parade to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

AsicBoost and the strange case of CVE-2017-9230

About CVEs

In the public interest of tracking and remedying cybersecurity vulnerabilities quickly, a public database was created in 2000: the CVE List [1].
CVE stands for Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Its database records, known as CVEs, track and record publicly known cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Each recorded vulnerability has a unique ID and lifecycle where it follows certain states.

The AsicBoost controversy

In April 2017, Greg Maxwell published an email [2] on the bitcoin-dev mailing list which described AsicBoost - a patented optimization to the algorithm used in Bitcoin mining - as an attack on the Bitcoin protocol.
There was much contention [3] about whether AsicBoost constituted some kind of harmful exploit, or whether it was merely a technological innovation which enabled more efficient mining hardware (ASICs).
There were allegations, widely reported in media, that the patent served the interest of Bitmain [4]. The purported benefits of exploiting this patent as alleged by Core developers were contemporaneously disputed by other miners [5].

CVE-2017-9230 raised against AsicBoost

On 18 May 2017, Cameron Garnham posted to the bitcoin-dev list [6], urging for getting a CVE assigned to the perceived vulnerability.
On 24 May 2017, this CVE was created as CVE-2017-9230 [7]. It was simultaneously published under Bugtraq ID 'BID 98657' at [8].
The justification in the CVE stated that the AsicBoost method
'violates the security assumptions of (1) the choice of input, outside of the dedicated nonce area, fed into the Proof-of-Work function should not change its difficulty to evaluate and (2) every Proof-of-Work function execution should be independent.'
It seemed a plausible enough reasoning for the CVE to be assigned. It was entered in the list of Bitcoin-related CVE's at [9]. Detailed information on this particular CVE is still missing/incomplete on the wiki page, a year after the CVE was raised.

What happened since the CVE was raised

If you've followed along, you've learned that the CVE was raised to counter the exploitation of the AsicBoost method by miners.
Since then, however, a Core developer, BtcDrak, has been involved in the founding of a mining company, Halong Mining. Several online sources state his (part?) ownership of this company.
BtcDrak has put forward a proposal [10] which would enable the use of AsicBoost within the Bitcoin Core software (the dominant client software on the BTC network).
This proposal appears to directly contradict the CVE claims of how AsicBoost violates "security assumptions" of Bitcoin, and indeed does not address how it mitigates them, nor is CVE-2017-9230 referenced in any of its related documentation.
While the proposal's specification [11] and implementation [12] have not yet been formally accepted, the situation is that Halong has shipped mining equipment which is now actively employing AsicBoost [13,14] on the Bitcoin (BTC) network. There is even a website showing the blocks where AsicBoost was used [15].

Conflict of interest

There a clear conflict of interest in the actions of the Core developer BtcDrak. His actions as a Core developer appear to be furthering his company's interests and competitive advantage in the mining industry by exploiting a vulnerability of which he must have been keenly aware, having participated on the same bitcoin-dev mailing list where it was discussed.
The CVE was vociferously used to paint Bitmain as culpable for delaying Segwit (Bitmain was accused of using AsicBoost and blocking Segwit activation for their own profit motive - claims that Bitmain has publicly denied strongly and which were never substantiated).
One might have expected a similar outcry against Halong's proven and announced use of AsicBoost, but the parties that had previously condemned Bitmain remained mostly silent. Only an anonymous non-developer, Cobra-Bitcoin, co-owner of the bitcoin.org domain, spoke out on the Github pull request in [11], and Core developer Luke-jr spoke out against the use of the proposal on the Bitcoin network while consensus had not been reached on it [16].
Subsequent discussion on the bitcoin-dev list on this topic since March has been minimal and only concerned with technicalities of stratum protocol changes.

The bigger elephant in the room

It seems logical that either AsicBoost constitutes an exploitable weakness, and thus merits a CVE and measures taken to prevent its use on the Bitcoin network entirely.
Or it is not a problem and the CVE should be invalidated.
The Bitcoin Core project should use its consensus processes to arrive at a coherent decision.

Other problems raised by the use of overt AsicBoost

The Halong implementation uses version rolling of the nversion bits of the header. It reserves a subset of those bits for overt AsicBoost.
These bits are no longer available to BIP9, but there was no update of BIP9 proposed to address this impact.
This is a question of sensible procedures being followed (or not). The author did not find any review comment mentioning the lack of BIP9 specification update, which suggest a lack of thorough review on a proposal which dates back several months.
A minor issue is that the Core implementation warns when a certain proportion of unrecognized version bits are detected. This behavior can be triggered by the AsicBoost method used on the network.
[1] https://cve.mitre.org/about/history.html
[2] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2017-April/013996.html
[3] https://news.bitcoin.com/developers-clash-exploit-secret-core-organization/
[4] https://archive.is/q2Q4t
[5] https://medium.com/@vcorem/the-real-savings-from-asicboost-to-bitmaintech-ff265c2d305b
[6] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2017-May/014349.html
[7] https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2017-9230
[8] https://www.securityfocus.com/bid/98657
[9] https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Common_Vulnerabilities_and_Exposures
[10] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2018-March/015801.html
[11] https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/pull/661
[12] https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/12633
[13] https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/halong-mining-first-bitcoin-mining-hardware-producer-implement-overt-asicboost/
[14] https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/slush-pool-now-compatible-asicboost-miners/
[15] https://asicboost.dance
[16] https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2018-March/015802.html
EDITS:
  1. make dates unambiguous, make it clear that [5] disputes the benefits alleged by Core developers
submitted by zcc0nonA to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

West Coast USA Digibyte Scrypt P2Pool Node. 0% Fee

Hey all,
I recently put up a DGB mining node for any miners out there. Scrypt only for now but if anyone is interested in mining via the other algorithms I can certainly look into setting one up!
If you're not familar with P2Pool, it's a little different than other pools. Read more about that here.
Anyways, I welcome any of you to join my Scrypt pool if you're interested in checking it out. There's a link to our mining group discord at the top of the pool as well if you want to drop by/have any questions! Just know it takes a day or so for your payouts to ramp up to max, but typically it pays out better than other mining methods from my tests.
Location: San Diego, CA USA
Connect to: stratum+tcp://dgb.brutang.work:5025
Worker: your DGB wallet
No password.
Web Interface: http://dgb.brutang.work:5025/static/
submitted by brutang to Digibyte [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

GHash.io just mined 4 blocks in a row. It seems like a problem.

Unless I'm mistaken, we've put a decentralized currency in the hands of centralized hashing cartels.
submitted by andyd00d to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

P2POOL NODES UP!

We just unleashed the Panda-Beast on the p2pool network..
In times of pools getting hashrates above of 2gh/s (by a total net hashrate @ 4.2 gh/s) its time to prevent the 51% by using a decentralized way of mining.
In short: "Mining solo in a group" :-) For everyone who never heard about p2ool and for everyone who wanna escape pool operators, ddos attacks and high pool and transaction fees:
read: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/P2Pool
Just point your miners to one of the two nodes by using your ThePandaCoin WalletAddress as your Username
example:
"vertminer --scrypt-vert -Q 0 -o stratum+tcp://.....:9190 -u PayoutAddress -p anything"
http://panda.qemulab.com:9190/ -> stratum+tcp://panda.qemulab.com:9190 http://bk-eu.cloudapp.net:9190 -> stratum+tcp://bk-eu.cloudapp.net:9190 (Northeurope) http://bk-us.cloudapp.net:9190/ -> stratum+tcp://bk-us.cloudapp.net:9190 (US Westcoast) http://bk-asia.cloudapp.net:9190 -> stratum+tcp://bk-asia.cloudapp.net:9190 (Asia)
Or just setup your local node by using this:
https://github.com/TheoRettisch/p2pool-panda
CU @ P2POOL :-)
P2POOL Scanner is Online : http://pandascanner.qemulab.com/
Thanks to TheoRettisch! :-)
submitted by derbrause to thepandacoin [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi + ASIC defcoin mining guide

Want to get started mining defcoin with an ASIC and a Raspberry Pi? Does 360 KH/s of mining power sound appealing? Here’s how to do it.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Blpj8IvCcAEIStY.jpg
1) Hardware List
-Raspberry Pi Model B
--SD Card
--Micro USB power supply
--Ethernet cable
-Gridseed ASIC
--12V power supply (5.5mm/2.5mm barrel connector)
--USB to Mini USB data cable
The main component is the Gridseed ASIC, which will be doing the Scrypt calculations. The Raspberry Pi will be used as the controller for the ASIC, and will be doing the communication with the mining pool. If you’re not familiar with the term, an ASIC is an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit - basically a chip with a single purpose, like mining crypto currency. Using an ASIC will allow us to mine more efficiently than we would be able to with general purpose hardware.
The ASIC that I’m using is a “300+ KH/s Single Gridseed ASIC Miner”. It looks like a CPU heatsink with a fan attached. There is actually a circuit board with 5 ASIC chips sandwiched between two halves of this heatsink, and has a mini USB connector and a power connector sticking out the side. There are a few places where you can buy these. I bought mine at GAWMiners.com for $130. That was the lowest price that I could find, and I had a good experience buying from them. Use this link, and you can get $20 off of a $200 order (and give me some referral points :-)) GAWMiners. You can also find other vendors by searching for “Gridseed ASIC”. You’ll need a 12V power supply to power the ASIC, and a USB A to USB Mini B cable to connect the ASIC to the Raspberry Pi. I’m using a 60W power supply, which seems to be working fine for defcoin (Scrypt) mining. These ASICs can also mine Bitcoin at the same time, but you may need a beefier power supply if you want to do that.
The Raspberry Pi can be purchased at any number of places- Amazon, SparkFun, AdaFruit, etc. I’m using the Model B because I had one already, and also because it has a built in ethernet port that will make connecting to the internet easy. Make sure to get an SD Card and a micro USB power adapter to get the Pi up and running too.
2) Software
If you haven’t already, download the defcoin wallet from defcoin.org. If you want to do pooled mining, create an account for one of the defcoin pools, such as redbaron.us or whichever other pool you want to mine. Once you’ve created a pool account, make sure to create a worker too (for MPOS pools, that will be under My Account > My Workers). The password for your worker does not have to be the same as the password for your pool account (and it probably shouldn’t be).
Next, download the latest Raspbian image from raspberrypi.org/downloads/ and install the image to your SD card. Instructions for installing the image can be found here. If you are using the dd method on a Mac, make sure to use /dev/rdiskX instead of /dev/diskX - both will work, but rdiskX is much faster. Once you have the image installed, put the SD card in the Raspberry Pi, connect the Pi to your network, and connect the Pi to your micro USB power adapter to power it on. Next, SSH in to your Raspberry Pi with the default username and password pi/raspberry. I use nMap to find the IP address that has been assigned to my Pi. You can also use an HDMI display and a USB keyboard to log in instead of using SSH. After logging in for the first time, run through the wizard that comes up to configure your Raspberry Pi. The defaults are fine for most things, just make sure that you don’t skip the step to expand the filesystem to use the rest of your SD card. If you don’t expand the filesystem, there won’t be enough space for other software.
Once you have Raspbian installed, and have gotten through all of the first login setup stuff (which will likely end with a reboot), log back in to the Raspberry Pi with the pi user. From the command line, run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
There are some stability issues with USB communication between the Raspberry Pi and the Gridseed ASIC. Enabling SLUB debugging seems to resolve this, at least well enough to prevent the Raspberry Pi from freezing every so often. Open the /boot/cmdline.txt file, and add the following text to the end of the line. Don’t add a new line, just add this to the end. You can use vi, nano, or whatever your favorite text editor is to do this.
slub_debug=FP 
Reboot the Raspberry Pi once you’ve added that flag to your /boot/cmdline.txt file.
sudo shutdown -r now 
Log back in with the pi user once the Raspberry Pi is finished rebooting.
The mining software that we’re going to use is a customized version of cgminer that has support for the Gridseed GC3355 chips that are used in our ASIC. There are a number of different mining programs out there, this is just what has been working the best for me so far. First, install git and dependencies needed to compile cgminer.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev libudev-dev autoconf automake 
Next, clone the git repository for cgminer-gc3355
git clone https://github.com/dtbartle/cgminer-gc3355.git 
Next, we’ll build cgminer.
cd cgminer-gc3355 autoreconf -i ./configure --enable-scrypt --enable-gridseed make 
Once the make command finishes, we’re ready to run the mining software. You can also run make install if you want to install the software, but running it out of the build directory works just fine. Plug in the power supply for your ASIC, and connect the ASIC to it. Connect the USB cable to the ASIC and to your Raspberry Pi. Run the mining software by running the following command. The -o option specifies your pool URL, the -u option specifies your username and the workername that you set up for the pool, and the -p option is the password for your worker. There are a couple of options available that are specific to the gridseed ASICs, and those will be placed after --gridseed-options. The freq=850 option sets the clock frequency of the ASIC to 850 MHz. There are other clock options available, but 850 seems to be working best for me. I was getting hardware errors at 900, and a lower average hash rate. I am getting about 360 KH/s with the clock frequency set to 850.
sudo ./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 
This command needs to be run with sudo in order to access the USB hardware. You can also create another user specifically for mining, or grant the pi user the appropriate permissions if you don’t want to run cgminer as root. When you run this command, you should see output from cgminer showing that it is communicating with the mining pool, and something showing your hash rate. If you’ve gotten this far, and you’re seeing output from cgminer showing a hash rate, congratulations, you’re mining defcoins with your ASIC! There are just a couple more steps to do if you want to let your Raspberry Pi and ASIC continue mining without needing you to be logged in.
To keep cgminer running after I log out, I am using nohup. You could also use screen instead of nohup. Create a script (startMiner.sh) by running the following commands.
echo “nohup /home/pi/cgminer-gc3355/cgminer --real-quiet -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 &” > /home/pi/startMiner.sh chmod a+x /home/pi/startMiner.sh 
If you run this command with sudo startMiner.sh, cgminer will run in the background, and will continue running after you log out. If you want to have this run when your Raspberry Pi boots, modify your /etc/rc.local script so that it executes this startMiner.sh script. Your /etc/rc.local file will end up looking like this:
# Print the IP address _IP=$(hostname -I) || true if [ "$_IP" ]; then printf "My IP address is %s\n" "$_IP" fi /home/pi/startMiner.sh exit 0 
That’s it! You should now have a Raspberry Pi controlling a defcoin mining ASIC, that starts mining as soon as it boots up. For more reading, check out some of the links below.
Gridseed GC3355 5 Chip Setup writeup on bitcointalk
cgminer-gc3355
Crypto Mining Blog
GAWMiners
raspberrypi.org
There are also some pre-built images for using a Raspberry Pi as an ASIC mining controller. I haven’t tried any of these myself, but they could be worth checking out. Raspberry Pi Controller Images with Gridseed ASIC Support
submitted by _RedBaron_ to defcoin [link] [comments]

So, DogeHouse is splitting - if you're looking for a new pool, try the P2Pool network

Hello fellow shibes ! You might have heard that DogeHouse (a very big pool, if not the biggest) is splitting into two separate pools. I am writing this post to suggest you an alternat--
What ?? Nobody told me that DogeHouse was closing ! What is going to happen to the Doge I stored there ?!
Well, that's not the point of this post, but don't worry - you can still hurry and do a manual payout here (Smiba said the accounts will stay available for 24h). You can also read more about the situation here. Also, don't store Dogecoins in a pool or exchange, unless you know what you're doing. Remember what happened to our Bitcoin friends with MtGox ? Yeah, we definitely don't want that to happen again with Dogecoin.
Anyway, back to the point. If you were mining on DogeHouse, you don't want to choose between the two new pools, and you want to keep torturing your GPU mining, you might want to try P2Pool.
What the hell is a P2Pool ?
To put it simply, the P2Pool network is a decentralized mining pool, constituted of several nodes working together. This allows for better latency if you use a node hosted near your city or country. Also, if a node goes dark, only a portion of the overall network will be disabled - which means the Dogecoin network will suffer less than if a big pool like DogeHouse suddenly goes offline.
Yeah that's cool and all but why would I personally want to switch to a P2Pool ?
There are several benefits to using a P2Pool. I already explained the advantages of P2Pool for Dogecoin itself ; there are also bonuses on a more personal basis.
First of all, you don't need to register an account at all ; you just pick a node and configure your miners with the node's hostname and your wallet adress. For instance :
cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://[YOUR NODE] -u [YOUR ADDRESS] -p wowdoge --auto-gpu 
That's all. You obviously will want to change the node (see below if you need to pick one) and the address (without the []). The password field is also completely indifferent, since no registration is needed.
Secondly, if you were having latency problems with a previous pool, you may find increased performances with P2Pool (since you will want to choose a node closer to where you mine).
Thirdly, the payouts are instantaneous and automatic ; you don't need to reach a fixed Doge threshold to have an automatic pay, and you don't need to pay an even more expensive fee to do a "manual payout". Your Doge will be transferred as soon as a block is mined. Also, the fees on the P2Pool nodes are usually a bit lower (through this will not significantly alter your earnings in itself).
Last but not least, some shibes reported an increase in the Doge earned per day ; I can't exactly say how or why, if this is real, just luck or placebo effect, but this is certainly worth mentioning.
Yeah, right, that's too good to be true... There's got to be a hidden twist in there...
P2Pool does have some downsides, yes - for instance, if you choose a node far from where you live, you will probably have a high ping (the time needed to contact the node) and thus you might see that you earn less Dogecoin than expected. That's why you'll want to choose the nearest node. Also, if you have a really low hashrate (I've seen the value of 100 kH/s mentioned several times), P2Pool might not be for you, since it relies on high speed and frequent shares.
I'm convinced ! Where do I start ?
Great ! First, you'll want to pick the nearest node from where you mine, as said before : this little site will come in handy. Using the first node in the list is generally the best solution since it is the node which is the fastest to ping. If you're unsure, try to refresh (F5) several times and check if the results are coherent.
Once you've got your pool, you just have to set your miner as seen before, with the correct host and Dogecoin address. And voilà, you're mining on the P2Pool network ! If you were accustomed to high-hashrate pools, you may have to wait a little more for your transfers - but don't worry, you should have biggest payouts to compensate.
If you are totally new to mining, welcome ! Try playing with the -I and --gpu-fan parameters to mine faster. Also, don't let your GPU heat unchecked. 60-70°C is probably the maximum safe temperature if you don't know what you are doing (higher temps are fine with some tricks and risk-taking, but it's a whole other matter). You might also want to read this, although some points might not apply if you use P2Pool.
That's all ! If you have any suggestions or corrections, don't hesitate to comment. You might also read more on P2Pools here and here.
submitted by Nife5 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

CUDAMiner Optimization Basics

I've posted this information a lot recently to new miners with NVIDIA cards. This subreddit seemed like the right home for it, and hopefully this is will serve as a helpful starting place to clarify the very basics and get people started.
As always, watch your GPU core temperatures closely. Lower hash rates correlate to lower operating temperatures. Play with these features to adjust your hash rate according to the load your GPU can handle. For example, one of my cards has better cooling than the other, so I run them at different hash rates to keep them both in the temperature range that I'm comfortable with.
Getting Started (Windows Environment):
  1. Download and install the latest NVIDIA Drivers.
  2. Download and extract the latest version of cudaMiner (SEE BITCOINTALK - CUDAMINER LINK BELOW) .
  3. Create a new text file in the same directory as cudaminer.exe (x32 or x64, depending on your system).
  4. Open text file and enter your configuration into the new batch file (See below for samples. Change settings to match your specific set-up):
  5. Change text file extension to .bat
  6. Execute batch file (not the executable).
  7. ???
  8. To exit, CTRL+C to break, wait, then Y to exit OR press the "Red X"; If the the command window closes immediately, add "pause" to the end of the batch script to view the error.
  9. If running x64 version, try x32 version and compare results.
  10. !!!
  11. Profit
Common Errors
Error Possible Cause
Command prompt window flashes and closes. Usually indicates bad syntax or attempting to launch executable. Review batch script settings. Add "pause" to end of batch script to view error.
Stratum Authentication Failed / "HTTP Request failed; No Error" Indicates connection issue. Review server address & user credentials.
Memory error / Result doesn't validate on CPU / Error 30 (Indicates launch configuration is invalid/not optimal. Change launch configuration flags. Update drivers.
"json_rpc_call failed" You are launching the executable; you cannot do this. Create and launch using batch script instead.
:::Sample Configurations (EDIT TO MATCH YOUR SPECIFIC CREDENTIALS & GPU SETTINGS) :::Single GPU ::SingleGPU.bat cudaminer.exe -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l auto -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW :::Multi GPU, Multi Command Prompt ::GPU0.bat (Address/Login for Standard Pool Mining, 1st GPU) cudaminer.exe -d 0 -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l auto -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW ::GPU1.bat (Address/Login for P2Pool Mining, 2nd GPU) cudaminer.exe -d 1 -i 1 -C 1 -m 1 -H 1 -l K4x32 -o stratum+http://YOUR.P2POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O WALLETADDRESS:ANYPW :::Multi GPU, Single Command Prompt ::DoubleGPU.bat cudaminer.exe -d 0,1 -H 1,1 -i 1,1 -l K3x9,K4x32 -C 1,1 -o stratum+tcp://YOUR.POOL.ADDRESS:#### -O USER.WORKER:WORKERPW 
Fundamental Flags:
  • FLAGS ARE CASE SENSITIVE
Setting -flag (Options) Description
cudaminer.exe N/A Call to execute cudaMiner
Specify Device -d (Any, counts from 0) Only for multi-GPU configurations: create multiple .bat files or use comma separated values.
Interactive Mode -i (0/1) When enabled, it reduces GPU utilization and hash rate to allow for computer use during mining
Enable Texture Cache -C (0/1/2) (Disabled, 1-D Caching, 2-D Caching) may increase or reduce hash rate, available according to your compute capability - check WIKI CUDA LINK BELOW
Memory Batching -m (0/1) Consolidates hash work into a single memory block and can lead to lower memory usage. Is implicitly enabled with Texture Caching.
Hash Parallel -H (0/1/2) (CPU Only, CPU Assist, GPU Only) determines how much work will be shared by the CPU. Defaults to GPU Only (2) if not specified.
Launch Configuration^ -l (auto/G/GBxW) Autotune, autotune for card generation, or specify particular setting. Defaults to autotune if not specified.
Server URL -o Address:Port Full URL of the mining server you wish to connect to.
Device Credentials -O User:Pass Username (or Username.Workername for pools) & password pair for the mining server for your device.
Debug-Benchmark Mode& -D --benchmark Verbose output to view block/warp chart and test a configuration.
  • NOTE ^ : This option is they key to tuning your hash rate and resulting GPU temperature. Choosing "auto" will enable autotuning, allowing cudaMiner to choose the best config. Choosing just "G," card generation code, will autotune for that specific card generation. "GBxW" is the specific setting you choose for the card where "BLOCK" is the row #, "WARP" is the Column number in autotune chart. Your BLOCKxWARP value should not exceed your maximum core configuration (WIKI GPU LIST BELOW), otherwise cudaMiner will crash/return error. For best results, the BLOCKxWARP value should be an exact multiple of your core config.
-For example NVIDIA GT 750M, Kepler card, row 4, column 32 is K4x32 (4x32=128). This is exactly 1/3 of and does not exceed the max core config of 384). 
  • NOTE & : Autotuning reported hashrates are not always accurate, but you can use the results in the benchmark table to choose the ballpark hash rate you desire. If you define a setting or allow it to complete the autotuning, it will then begin the benchmark and show you the average hashrate once you end the sesion (CTRL+C). Before closing the command prompt, you can scroll back up and save a screenshot of the block table. Type "Y" after ending to close the program. Remember to turn OFF the flag -D --benchmark after you are done. This is benchmark mode; cudaMiner will not connect to the pool until you remove this flag
Sources & Additional References:
BitcoinTalk - cudaMiner Downloads & Latest News
Netcode Pool - cudaMiner Guide
/dogemining - NVIDIA Tuning Guide
Hardware Specifications/Comparisons
Wikipedia - Comparison of NVIDIA GPUs
Wikipedia - CUDA
cudaMiner Devs - cudaMiner scrypt Hashrate list
Litecoin WIKI - Hardware Comparison List
Litecoin WIKI - Hardware Comparison List (Raw Data)
Last Updated Mar 1, 2014
NyanCoins: KKvQjafJ3QckoCNQtdLkDfieBqUpuAVM4y
DogeCoins: DD4TcmjNE9RhVBaSadZDkqZtTQfyUstsFL
Or tips! Contributions greatly appreciated!
submitted by FwuffyKittens to nyanmining [link] [comments]

Help me set up a casual Doge Miner

Hey fellow shibes,
I already tried alot of things and right now, I am running against a brick wall of problems and questions.
Here's my setup:
Here are my current problems :
cgminer.exe -v 1 -k poclbm -I 6 --gpu-engine 1100 --gpu-memclock 950 --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://stratum.netcodepool.org:4093 -u AmanRevenger.7850 -p password
from here
and it would be running with roundabout 950 Kh/s whui, however, my workers nor my wallet nor my Dashboard would be updating after 8 hours of "mining" today: http://i.imgur.com/QoEpuni.png
I didnt get any valid shares, nothing. I have no idea what I did do wrong.
Can somebody please help me? I am out of options.
submitted by AmansRevenger to dogemining [link] [comments]

Cannot get over 450kH/s with my 7970..please help

I'm able to hit 730Mh/s bitcoin mining with my Asus Matrix Platinum [email protected] 1250mhz core/1725mhz memory...but for some reason i cannot get over 450kH/s reliably litecoin mining.
Using the configs they use in https://github.com/litecoin-project/litecoin/wiki/Mining-hardware-comparison
Using either CGMiner or GUIMiner - none of the 7970 configs are very good for me
The highest stable memory i can get is 1725mhz...so using 0.57 rule, ive tried a core speed 984mhz..still doesnt help too much. Anyone have other configs i can try? I'm using give-me-ltc.com as my pool.
EDIT: Also using the newest 13.3 Beta drivers...i wonder if this has something to do with it..or maybe i should change pools..
These are the flags im using:
cgminer --scrypt -u jerrolds.worker1 -p x -o stratum+tcp://stratum.give-me-ltc.com:3333 --shaders 2048 --worksize 256 --intensity 13 --thread-concurrency 8192 
submitted by jerrolds to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

testing

I'm working on enabling merge mining for the Prohashing mining pool. I've spent 45 hours trying to get the dogecoin daemon to accept a merge mined block, with no success. I'm posting my progress in this post, in the hopes that someone who has experience in merge mining can figure out what is wrong. I'll tip the first person $50 in DOGE (about 180,000 DOGE at current rates) who can tell me what is wrong with what I'm doing. If there are multiple issues, then I'll split the reward amongst all the helpers.
I simplified the procedure by removing the parts of the algorithm that are irrelevant.
Here is the procedure I used:
  1. Get the latest block from the litecoin testnet and store its data in memory.
  2. Call getauxblock against the dogecoin testnet. Since this example is only going to merge mine dogecoins, we ignore "chainid" and store only "hash" in memory. "Target" is obtained by calling getblocktemplate, because we need difficulty and other things from the full template for calculating payouts. "Target" in getauxblock and in getblocktemplate are reversed, so the appropriate conversion is made.
  3. When a block is found for the litecoin testnet, check to see whether the target is less than the dogecoin testnet's target. If so, we call getauxblock again, passing the "hash" exactly as provided in step 2, without any modification, and the serialized block data as the second parameter. The help for the command states that the parameters are "getauxblock [hash] [auxpow]."
The result is that the litecoin blocks are always accepted, and the dogecoin blocks are always rejected with the following errors:
2014-10-09 02:37:45 ERROR: Aux POW merkle root incorrect 2014-10-09 02:37:45 ERROR: AUX POW is not valid 
Here is an example "auxpow" serialized block that is submitted to the dogecoin damon. I annotated it as I think is correct, but keep in mind that the annotations could be incorrect and you shouldn't assume that I have identified the correct things to insert or the correct order. In the real submission, there are no spaces or characters between the separated sections.
Litecoin coinbase transaction:
02000000010000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000ffffffff52034e5106062f503253482f04c93c3754fabe6d6d50868b4be2c645d5b763f8b2f137e87e48ed7154db9e7a5083a4d4582fdfbeec010000000000000008f8000006190000000c2f50726f68617368696e672f000000000100f2052a010000001976a914c7045a47e3aff57c28a728c7339150efc879555488ac000000000a50726f68617368696e67 
Double-SHA-256 hash of the litecoin block header:
0309e093c93a7560ecde4128c13371ee4778bd195a03681e57aeacd694094600 
The length of the merkle branch from the litecoin block, which is the same as the branch sent out in the stratum protocol. Because this litecoin block has no transactions, the length of the merkle branch is zero:
00 
The litecoin merkle branch, if there were one, would go here in a series of hashes. Since there are no transactions in the block other than the coinbase transaction, we append nothing here.
[There is nothing here] 
The "branch side mask" of the coinbase transaction, which is always zeroes:
00000000 
The auxiliary branch count, which is zero because we are only mining dogecoins in this example:
00 
The auxiliary branch index, which is also zero because we are only mining dogecoins:
00000000 
The block header of the litecoin block, in full:
0000000254a8f234ca1f2448ca9a85dcade4697e1496fa46a22abe8ffb0cfc604a4d11371b31c4accb59203d465c70588f1fd68eddd93e25da83101bbaa68aa02244800454373c611d02324089d3403e 
I'll also break down my understanding of what is supposed to be placed in the litecoin coinbase transaction to signify that we are merge mining dogecoins. Here is my understanding of the litecoin coinbase transaction's merge mining portion, which you can find embedded within the coinbase transaction printed above:
This string signifies that we are merge mining.
fabe6d6d 
The "hash" parameter obtained from the dogecoin daemon's getauxblock command, verbatim:
50868b4be2c645d5b763f8b2f137e87e48ed7154db9e7a5083a4d4582fdfbeec 
The following are used for when multiple merge-mined coins are being sought at the same time, but since we are only merge-mining dogecoins, this is a 4-byte 1 followed by a 4-byte 0.
0100000000000000 
Here are some of the things I tried and the references I used.
  1. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Merged_mining_specification seems to be the primary source on merge mining. However, I noticed that some of the examples in the document don't work with dogecoins. For example, the "block hash" in the auxiliary proof of work that is submitted to namecoin in that document (the second field) looks like the proof of work hash for the block, since it ends in a string of zeroes. Looking at that, I tried placing the scrypt proof of work hash in that field, but it didn't work.
My understanding of the "block hash" is that when you call getblock from a daemon, you provide the double SHA-256 hash of the block header, not the scrypt proof of work hash. The "block hash" is not the scrypt proof of work hash.
  1. I tried reversing various hashes in the fields of the blocks on the theory that endianness was the problem, but 16 different permutations didn't work. I tried reversing the dogecoin auxiliary hash, the block hash, the merkle branch hashes (when there are transactions in the litecoin block, which there are not in this example), and even the block header of the litecoin block. None of these things worked. I couldn't find a permutation of reversed and non-reversed hashes that made any difference. Of course, it is possible that, since there are so many permutations, that I missed the correct one and the hashes are not in the correct endianness in the example.
  2. At http://forum.namecoin.info/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=368, there is a poster who offers advice on how to submit merge mined blocks to getauxblock, although that information is specific to namecoin. I reviewed what I was doing and it appears to be identical to what he is suggesting.
  3. After reviewing the documentation for what a merkle tree is, it took me an entire day to figure out what happens when there are an odd number of transactions in the tree. It turns out that the algorithm is to hash the nodes with themselves. Seeing this, I took the example above and I tried specifying the length of the "merkle branch" for the coinbase transaction as "01," and then provided the hash of the coinbase transaction as the only hash in the "merkle branch." The long-shot idea was that perhaps the dogecoin daemon was looking to hash the coinbase transaction with itself, and use that as the root of the tree. It still returned the same error.
  4. In the litecoin coinbase transaction, the 44-byte merge mining part (fabe + "mm") is preceded by the length (44, or 2c) in some examples, but not in others. Apparently, this length is not necessary if the merge mining string is provided within the first 20 characters of the script, so I left it out in this example. However, in previous iterations, I added an additional byte of "2c" before the merge mining portion and it did not result in any difference in this error.
  5. In these examples, I always assumed that the merkle branches are double-sha256 hashes, even for scrypt coins. All the documentation I read seems to indicate that in scrypt, the only difference is the algorithm used to verify work. From what I can tell, the rest of the block still is stored using SHA-256 hashes, as is the hash of the block headers and even the hashes of the transactions. If there is some difference between scrypt and SHA-256 in how the merge mining headers are stored, that could be a clue.
Thanks to anyone who is willing to try to point out what is wrong here. We have about 15 features ready for release and merge mining is the only one that is holding back the release. Your help is greatly appreciated.
submitted by chris_sokolowski to test [link] [comments]

3º Bitcoin Summit - Stratum - Apresentação palestra Dash ... 3º Bitcoin Summit - Stratum CoinBr - Interview with Sterlin Lujan from Bitcoin Cash 3º Bitcoin Summit - Stratum CoinBr goes Global - Interview ... 3º Bitcoin Summit - Stratum CoinBr Entrevista com o ... 3º Bitcoin Summit 2018 - Stratum CoinBr - Florianópolis ...

From Bitcoin Wiki. Jump to: navigation, search. Stratum is a proposal for an open source client-server "overlay" protocol that enables thin clients. It is currently used by Electrum. While originally announced right before 2012, the protocol has not yet been completed and proposed as a BIP for standardisation. Mining extensions. Main page: Stratum mining protocol. In addition to its use for ... Stratum-Mining-Proxy . Der Stratum-Mining-Proxy ermöglicht Mining-Software, die das alte Getwork-Protokoll unterstützt, um das moderne Stratum-Mining-Protokoll zu verwenden, das von unserem Pool bereitgestellt wird. Wir werden hier nicht auf vollständige technische Details und Gründe für die Gestaltung des Stratum-Protokolls eingehen. Wenn ... Stratum mining proxy . Stratum mining proxy allows mining software supporting the old Getwork protocol to use modern Stratum mining protocol provided by our pool. We will not cover full technical details and reasoning for designing the Stratum protocol here. If you are looking for those, please find your way over here. Stratumn - Proof of Process Technology helps companies and organizations to trust the millions of processes that connect our world. Mining is the process where nodes in the Bitcoin Network assemble newly broadcast Bitcoin Transactions into a data structure called a block. Nodes then compete to append their block to the public Block chain by repeatedly mutating the block's header data structure, usually by incrementing the nonce field, then hashing it in an attempt to find a value that satisfies a difficult proof-of-work ...

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3º Bitcoin Summit - Stratum - Apresentação palestra Dash ...

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