A Rare Look Inside A Massive Bitcoin Mine – TechCrunch

Of the top 10 mining pools, which ones are powered by user-hashing, and which ones have their own giant, liquid-cooled server farms? /r/Bitcoin

Of the top 10 mining pools, which ones are powered by user-hashing, and which ones have their own giant, liquid-cooled server farms? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

PoW or PoS: The Difference Between Mined and Non-Mined Crypto

PoW or PoS: The Difference Between Mined and Non-Mined Crypto
The whole crypto world discusses how Ethereum will switch from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake now. This change can significantly affect the cryptocurrency market. What are the positive and negative sides of PoW and PoS?
Cryptocurrencies can be divided into two types: those that can be mined (Bitcoin, Litecoin, Monero) and pre-mined ones (Ripple, Stellar, Cardano, EOS, NEO).

What is the big difference?

Although they differ in the method of generation, the basis of both types of crypto is the same: verification. Every transaction processed by the network must be verified by someone to ensure that virtual money has not been spent twice. Here we are talking about the difference in the verification process. Transaction groups are combined into a block; after verification, the block joins other previously confirmed blocks, and create a chain of transactions, or blockchain.

PoW: Mined Crypto

Mining is a process in which individuals, groups, or companies solve complex mathematical equations to verify transaction blocks using powerful computers. These math problems are part of the encryption process that protects transactions from cybercriminals and third party access.
The first who solves the problem and signs a block of transactions receives a reward. The miner, who confirmed the block of transactions e.g. in the Bitcoin network, receives a reward in BTC.

Disadvantages of Mined Crypto

  • Mining can be very expensive due to the large amounts of electricity consumed. In mined crypto with less capitalization, competition is usually lower than in BTC.
  • BTC mining requires special ASIC chips, that are combined into huge farms. Electricity is one of the main expenses for these projects. That is why China, where electricity is relatively cheap, has become a home to four of the five largest Bitcoin mining companies in the world.
  • Mining farms have to spend significant money funds on new equipment, which becomes out of date very fast.
  • Large projects need additional cooling, as servers and graphics cards heat up to high temperatures during operations.
  • The Proof-of-Work model is potentially vulnerable to a 51% attack (when a group of people with 51% of the computing power gains control of the network and its participants). For popular cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (BTC), Litecoin (LTC), and Monero (XMR) this is not a problem due to their large capitalization. However, minor cryptocurrencies with long block processing times and low daily volumes are risking a lot.

PoS: Non-Mined Crypto

At the other end of the spectrum are pre-mined cryptocurrencies such as Ripple (XRP), Stellar, Cardano, EOS, and NEO.
In the PoS model, super-powered computers are not needed, and participants do not compete for the right to sign the next block. Thus, the costs of this approach are significantly lower. Transaction verification is carried out by cryptocurrency owners. The more cryptocurrencies you have, the longer you own it, the higher the probability that you will be selected to check the transaction block.
Certain mechanisms are built into the system that prevents the dominance of large cryptocurrency holders over the verification process. There are many random ways to select owners who get the right to sign a transaction block. This ensures that small holders have a chance to participate in the process.

Disadvantages of Non-Mined Crypto

Despite the fact that the costs of the Proof-of-Stake method are lower, PoS has its drawbacks.
  • Such cryptocurrencies are not threatened by an attack of 51%, however, another trouble replaces it — a person who posses 51% of all tokens in circulation can gain control of the network and its participants. Of course, in the case of cryptocurrencies with high capitalization, the possibility of this scenario is low, but small partners may suffer from this vulnerability.
  • The Proof-of-Stake model also gives major owners additional votes in determining the future development of the network. Most NEO tokens) belong to several founders, for instance. This helps increase transaction speed and reduces consensus-building time, but also makes cryptocurrency too centralized. In other words, in the PoS model, large players gain significant power, which is theoretically impossible with the PoW model.

Which method is better?

Both methods have their pros and cons. Nevertheless, sooner or later, some of the largest mined currencies (e.g. BTC) will reach their token limit. At this point, they will have to switch to Proof-of-Stake. Since it significantly reduces power consumption and doesn't require powerful computers, gradually all crypto including BTC will switch to a non-mined model just like Ether did.

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submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to ethtrader [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
______________________
Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
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Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
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Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
______________________
Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
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Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
______________________
Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
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Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
______________________
Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
______________________
Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
______________________
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**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

______________________
CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

______________________
MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
______________________


RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
______________________
THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
______________________
POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
______________________
STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
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Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
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Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

Smart contracts and blockchain technology are being actively implemented in many areas and projects. If you are looking for an interesting project with a promising future, then pay attention to this project.

The first few BOLTON mining centres were built and deployed in mid?2018, focusing on mining Bitcoin and profitable Altcoins. State?of?the?art servers at each mining farm are equipped with waterless, free?cooling ventilation systems, non?combustible materials, and are secured from threats in any form. Mining equipment operates on task?specific processors for increased effectivity.
Follow bfclcoin.com

#BoltonCoinSTO #BoltonCoinBFCL #STO #Lion #dailyprofit #yourwinningmove @BFCLcoin

submitted by NadiaIvas to BFCLCoin [link] [comments]

The end scenario for the buttchain

Global total mining reward for buttcoin begins to decrease.
Some miners quit, difficulty goes down. It is good for bitcoin, as everyone keeps talking about how much electricity it uses and how it should be banned.
Under the perpetual smog in a Chinese industrial park, a set of warehouses full of mining hardware scales down, running at partial capacity and selling off some parts of the cooling system (the actual mining hardware finds no buyers, and a regular server farm does not move in as the location is unfavorable for the high bandwidth internet). The mining operation is eventually stopped entirely, but the warehouse is carefully mothballed, for it is not done.
No new ASICs can be made at smaller scaling - the mining reward is not large enough to employ expensive engineers.
Everything goes smoothly at first, the butters continue to trade shitcoins for shitcoins, scamming one another, and being sorry for each other's losses. Bitcoin jumps up and down; increasingly large fraction of bitcoins is lost from the market, so the total supply is much smaller, helping combat the decrease in demand. The forkers keep forking, the scammers keep scamming, the fools keep being foolish.
A view of the same industrial park, under a sky that may be slightly cleaner than the last time (It is hard to tell the difference; maybe you are just convincing yourself that it got better). It is shortly after dawn, when the warehouse is at it's coldest.
Mothballed warehouses full of ASICs wake up one last time, reclaiming the glory of the olden days. Dusty fans spin up. Some capacitors pop, some magic smoke escapes, some sparks fly, but the bulk of the system comes online. It was very well made, back in the day when miners could afford competent engineers. It has more hashing power, by far, than the rest of the network, but it is running at a loss, and it is now overheating. An unusual command resonates through the warehouses, raising the clock frequency, decreasing efficiency per hash.
It can't run for long.
It does it's work in the final exit scam and shuts down, this time for good.
submitted by dizekat to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

A project have great potential. Have a good team with a good idea. I think it will open a new opportunity in the future of crypto.

The first few BOLTON mining centres were built and deployed in mid 2018, focusing on mining Bitcoin and profitable Altcoins. State of the art servers at each mining farm are equipped with waterless, free cooling ventilation systems, non combustible materials, and are secured from threats in any form. Mining equipment operates on task?specific processors for increased effectivity.
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submitted by NadiaIvas to BFCLCoin [link] [comments]

Facebook’s Libra won’t be as power-hungry as Bitcoin

Libra, Facebook’s new cryptocurrency, is expected to have a smaller environmental footprint compared to some of its more notorious blockchain brethren, including bitcoin, according to experts. Its energy demands are projected to be more like those of existing data centers — which, while still demanding, aren’t quite as energy-hungry as mining bitcoins.
The currency hasn’t launched yet, so it’s hard to know how those claims will stack up against reality. But its design — more centralized than most cryptocurrencies — means that Libra will likely draw less energy. Unlike its more decentralized peers, only a few trusted members of the Libra Association, the centralized hub for the currency, can create Libra.
AN ORDER OF MAGNITUDE MORE EFFICIENT THAN BITCOIN
“This is an order of magnitude more efficient than bitcoin will ever be,” says Ulrich Gallersdörfer, a researcher at Technical University of Munich focused on blockchain research. Gallersdörfer was the co-author on a recent paper in Joule30255-7) finding that bitcoin operations emit more climate-warming gas than the country of Jordan.
Bitcoin uses so much energy because people who want to hold the cryptocurrency have to compete for it. That means bitcoin mining operations need huge amounts of computing power to snag a single coin, and to stay in the running, they all need to be running a set of complicated problems all at once. That uses a huge amount of energy every year — in 2018, researchers estimated that bitcoin used about as much energy as Ireland.
By contrast, Libra is designed so that an algorithm issues units of the cryptocurrency in proportion to the size of a company’s initial deposit into the system. That’s still a lot to keep track of, but it’s nowhere near as complicated as a mining operation. Instead, it’s more like… normal data centers. Now, data centers draw power, too. In fact, data centers accounted for 2 percent of the total US energy usage in 2014, a 2016 study published by the DOE found. And they’re also responsible for about as many carbon dioxide emissions as the airline industry. But despite those drawbacks, these specially designed warehouses of servers are the rocks on which tech giants like Facebook continue to build and expand their digital empire.
“Facebook or other companies will have to set up servers, will have to run the software, will have to validate transactions. But that’s not really anything different to running regular services for Facebook.com or for WhatsApp,” Gallersdörfer says.
A USEFUL WAY TO GENERALLY CONSIDER HOW TO MAKE DATA CENTERS LESS ENVIRONMENTALLY TERRIBLE
Facebook has made concerted efforts to make their centers more sustainable, but the energy demand prompted by Libra might be a useful way to generally consider how to make data centers less environmentally terrible. The easiest thing to do is make sure that the existing resources are used efficiently — so that might mean more efficient hardware. But it also means considering the vast amounts of water used to cool servers: in a lot of cases that fresh water flows through the system and gets discarded, a horrifying waste, especially in areas with water shortages.
One way to meet the challenge in a water-scarce world is to reuse water as often as possible, says Emilio Tenuta, vice president of sustainability at Ecolab. But water can’t be reused forever in cooling systems. As it gets heated and moves through the pipes, salts and other contaminants — think of scale from hard water forming in a bathroom — can build up in the machinery, making it less efficient. But by constantly monitoring and treating the water as it goes through a system, companies like Ecolab hope they can recirculate water through cooling systems as often as possible, reducing the amount of water used in data centers overall.
Making existing centers more efficient is great, but products on the scale of Libra could mean new data centers — and where they are matters. Companies could save themselves (and the world) a lot of environmental angst by simply looking for better locations to put data centers in the first place, Katrina Kelly-Pitou says.
THE AREA WHERE WE’RE FAILING, IN THE UNITED STATES, IS CLEANING OUR POWER SUPPLY
Kelly-Pitou, an urban systems strategist with architecture and engineering firm SmithGroup, says that companies should look for places with trained software engineers — to keep the servers running smoothly — and abundant, low-carbon power sources. By relying on a nearby hydroelectric dam, wind farm, or nuclear plant instead of coal or natural gas, data centers could dramatically cut their carbon footprint. That’s because ultimately, every data center relies on the energy grid. And that’s where many current data centers are falling short.
“The area where we’re failing, in the United States, is cleaning our power supply, and ensuring that we have clean energy to power the economic development that we want,” Kelly-Pitou says.
Libra hasn’t launched. We don’t know if it will take off. But for it to even get off the ground, it will need data centers — and developing greener data centers, and a lower-carbon energy grid to power them is something that could pay off no matter what.
submitted by VoltzUK to u/VoltzUK [link] [comments]

BOLTON

Superior technology is key to sustainable positioning as a leading figure in cryptocurrency activities. BOLTON’s commitment to reinvesting in cutting‐edge mining hardware gives the BOLTON Community benefits of innovation.
A large‐scale cryptocurrency mining operation is only as good as its equipment, and the allocation of funds for continual rejuvenation of hardware is one of the traits that elevates BOLTON beyond comparatives. The first few BOLTON mining centres were built and deployed in mid‐2018, focusing on mining Bitcoin and profitable Altcoins.
State‐of‐the‐art servers at each mining farm are equipped with waterless, free‐cooling ventilation systems, non‐combustible materials, and are secured from threats in any form. Mining equipment operates on task specific processors for increased effectivity.
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submitted by haa231900 to CryptoICONews [link] [comments]

What is Bolton Coin?

BOLTON Coin (BFCL) offers a new amazing and unique approach to investing in the crypto sphere, generating aggregates profits from tangible luxurious markets such as gold and diamonds mining, real estate, integrated by eco-sustainable energy and extraordinary form of BTC crypto-mining. Low costs in fees for mining guarantee stable income also in the face of difficulty increases. The business generates profit in other areas, even a sustained bear market cannot affect the profits of the program, like this, is the case with most crypto projects.
About Bolton Coin BOLTON is an innovative company dealing in the holding and managing of assets in high‐profit industries. BOLTON established the BFCL Coin to offer its clients the opportunity to benefit from BOLTON's differing investment sources, balancing between the old and new economy in three major sectors — real estate, cryptocurrency mining, and commodity trading — all activities of which BOLTON possesses elite technical knowledge and expertise. All engagements are tied together by a visionary model of transparent and equitable profit sharing using Ethereum‐based smart contracts.
BOLTON, DIGITISED
BOLTON is entering the quickly‐expanding arena of digital currency in a truly definitive manner by establishing one of the world’s largest crowdfunded cryptocurrency mining operations. The foundation of this new, cutting‐edge operation, however, will but built upon more traditional but reliably profitable investments in real estate and commodity trading.
This monumental project is being managed by veteran data centre industry experts, pacesetters in cryptocurrency, and authoritative finance experts with decades of experience — all working to benefit the BOLTON Community. BOLTON both recognises and understands this gripping, already‐transformative evolution of the financial world and the benefits decentralisation brings to society as a whole.
BOLTON Community members will transparently and equitably share in output through the use of Ethereum‐based, secure smart contracts. All Community members receive BFCL Tokens representing their activity in BOLTON. Gains from BOLTON’s combined investment sources are distributed daily to Token holders and are viewable on each individual’s Dashboard.
ADVANCED CRYPTO MINING TECHNOLOGY
Superior technology is key to sustainable positioning as a leading figure in cryptocurrency activities. BOLTON’s commitment to reinvesting in cutting‐edge mining hardware gives the BOLTON Community benefits of innovation. A large‐scale cryptocurrency mining operation is only as good as its equipment, and the allocation of funds for continual rejuvenation of hardware is one of the traits that elevates BOLTON beyond comparatives.
The first few BOLTON mining centres were built and deployed in mid‐2018, focusing on mining Bitcoin and profitable Altcoins. State‐of‐the‐art servers at each mining farm are equipped with waterless, free‐cooling ventilation systems, non‐combustible materials, and are secured from threats in any form. Mining equipment operates on task‐specific processors for increased effectivity.
EXCHANGE LIST
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submitted by icoinformation2021 to BoltonCoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining & The Beauty Of Capitalism

Authored by Valentin Schmid via The Epoch Times,
While the price of bitcoin drops, miners get more creative... and some flourish.
The bitcoin price is crashing; naysayers and doomsayers are having a field day. The demise of the dominant cryptocurrency is finally happening — or is it?
Bitcoin has been buried hundreds of times, most notably during the brutal 90 percent decline from 2013 to 2015. And yet it has always made a comeback.
Where the skeptics are correct: The second bitcoin bubble burst in December of last year and the price is down roughly 80 percent from its high of $20,000. Nobody knows whether and when it will see these lofty heights again.
As a result, millions of speculators have been burned, and big institutions haven’t showed up to bridge the gap.
This also happened on a smaller scale in 2013 after a similar 100x run-up, and it was necessary.

Time to Catch Up

What most speculators and even some serious proponents of the independent and decentralized monetary system don’t understand: Bitcoin needs these pauses to make improvements in its infrastructure.
Exchanges, which could not handle the trading volumes at the height of the frenzy and did not return customer service inquiries, can take a breather and upgrade their systems and hire capable people.
The technology itself needs to make progress and this needs time. Projects like the lightning network, a system which delivers instant bitcoin payments at very little cost and at virtually unlimited scale is now only available to expert programmers.
A higher valuation is only justified if these improvements reach the mass market.
And since we live in a world where everything financial is tightly regulated, for better or worse, this area also needs to catch up, since regulators are chronically behind the curve of technological progress.
And of course, there is bitcoin mining. The vital infrastructure behind securing the bitcoin network and processing its transactions has been concentrated in too few hands and in too few places, most notably China, which still hosts about 70 percent of the mining capacity.

The Case For Mining

Critics have always complained that bitcoin mining consumes “too much” electricity, right now about as much as the Czech Republic. In energy terms this is around 65 terawatt hours or 230,000,000 gigajoules, costing $3.3 billion dollars according to estimates by Digiconomist.
For the non-physicists among us, this is around as much as consumed by six million energy-guzzling U.S. households per year.
All those estimates are imprecise because the aggregate cannot know how much energy each of the different bitcoin miners consumes and how much that electricity costs. But they are a reasonable rough estimate.
So it’s worth exploring why mining is necessary to begin with and whether the electricity consumption is justified.
Anything and everything humans do consumes resources. The question then is always: Is it worth it? And: Who decides?
This question then leads to the next question: Is it worth having and using money? Most people would argue yes, because using money instead of barter in fact makes economic transactions faster and cheaper and thus saves resources, natural and human.

_Merchants exchange goods with the inhabitants of Tidore, Indonesia, circa 1550. Barter was supplanted by using money because it is more efficient. (Archive/Getty Images)_If we are generously inclined, we will grant bitcoin the status of a type of money or at least currency as it meets the general requirements of being recognizable, divisible, portable, durable, is accepted in exchange for other goods and services, and in this case it is even limited in supply.
So having any type of money has a price, whether it’s gold, dollar bills, or numbers on the screen of your online banking system. In the case of bitcoin, it’s the electricity and the capital for the computing equipment, as well as the human resources to run these operations.
If we think having money in general is a good idea and some people value the decentralized and independent nature of bitcoin then it would be worth paying for verifying transactions on the bitcoin network as well as keeping the network secure and sound: Up until the point where the resources consumed would outweigh the efficiency benefits. Just like most people don’t think it’s a bad idea to use credit cards and banks, which consume electricity too.
However, bitcoin is a newcomer and this is why it’s being scrutinized even more so than the old established players.

Different Money, Different Costs

How many people know how much electricity, human lives, and other resources gold mining consumes or has consumed in the course of history? What about the banking system? Branches, servers, air-conditioning, staff? What about printing dollar notes and driving them around in armored trucks?
What about the social effects of monetary mismanagement of bank and government money like inflation as well as credit deflations? Gold gets a pass here.
Most people haven’t asked that question, which is why it’s worth pointing out the only comprehensive study done on the topic in 2014. In “An Order of Magnitude” the engineer Hass McCook analyzes the different money systems and reaches mind-boggling conclusions.
The study is a bit dated and of course the aggregations are also very rough estimates, but the ball park numbers are reasonable and the methodology sound.
In fact, according to the study, bitcoin is the most economic of all the different forms of money.
Gold mining in 2014 used 475 million GJ, compared to bitcoin’s 230 million in 2018. The banking system in 2014 used 2.3 billion gigajoules.
Over 100 people per year die trying to mine gold. But mining costs more than electricity. It consumes around 300,000 liters of water per kilogram of gold mined as well as 150 kilogram (330 pounds) of cyanide and 1500 tons of waste and rubble.
The international banking system has been used in all kinds of fraudulent activity throughout history: terrorist financing, money laundering, and every other criminal activity under the sun at a cost of trillions of dollars and at an order of magnitude higher than the same transactions done with cryptocurrency and bitcoin.
And of course, while gold has a relatively stable value over time, our bank and government issued money lost about 90 percent of its purchasing power over the last century, because it can be created out of thin air. This leads to inflation and a waste of physical and human resources because it distorts the process of capital allocation.

_The dollar has lost more than 90 percent of its value since the creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913. (Source: St. Louis Fed)_This is on top of the hundreds of thousands of bank branches, millions of ATMs and employees which all consume electricity and other resources, 10 times as much electricity alone as the bitcoin network.
According to monetary philosopher Saifedean Ammous, author of “The Bitcoin Standard,” the social benefit of hard money, i.e. money that can’t be printed by government decree, cannot even be fathomed; conversely, the true costs of easy money—created by government fiat and bank credit—are difficult to calculate.
According to Ammous, bitcoin is the hardest money around, even harder than gold because its total supply is capped, whereas the gold supply keeps increasing at about 1-2 percent every year.
“Look at the era of the classical gold standard, from 1871, the end of the Franco–Prussian War, until the beginning of World War I. There’s a reason why this is known as the Golden Era, the Gilded Age, and La Belle Epoque. It was a time of unrivaled human flourishing all over the world. Economic growth was everywhere. Technology was being spread all over the world. Peace and prosperity were increasing everywhere around the world. Technological innovations were advancing.
“I think this is no coincidence. What the gold standard allowed people to do is to have a store of value that would maintain its value in the future. And that gave people a low time preference, that gave people the incentive to think of the long term, and that made people want to invest in things that would pay off over the long term … bitcoin is far closer to gold. It is a digital equivalent of gold,” he said in an interview with The Epoch Times.
Of course, contrary to the gold standard that Ammous talks about, bitcoin doesn’t have a track record of being sound money in practice. In theory it meets all the criteria, but in the real world it hasn’t been adopted widely and has been so volatile as to be unusable as a reliable store of value or as the underlying currency of a productive lending market.
The proponents argue that over time, these problems will be solved the same way gold spread itself throughout the monetary sphere replacing copper and seashells, but even Ammous concedes the process may take decades and the outcome is far from certain. Gold is the safe bet for sound money, bitcoin has potential.
There is another measure where bitcoin loses out, according to a recent study by researchers from the Oak Ridge Institute in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It is the amount of energy expended per dollar for different monetary instruments. One dollar worth of bitcoin costs 17 megajoules to mine versus five for gold and seven for platinum. But the study omits the use of cyanide, water, and other physical resources in mining physical metals.
In general, the comparisons in dollar terms go against bitcoin because it is worth relatively less, only $73 billion in total at the time of writing. An issue that could be easily fixed at a higher price, but a higher price is only justified if the infrastructure improves, adoption increases, volatility declines, and the network proves its resilience to attacks over time.
In the meantime, market participants still value the fact they can own a currency independent of the government, completely digital, easily fungible, and limited in supply, and relatively decentralized. And the market as a whole is willing to pay a premium for these factors reflected in the higher per dollar prices for mining bitcoin.

The Creativity of Bitcoin Mining

But where bitcoin mining lacks in scale, it makes up for it in creativity.
In theory—and in practice—bitcoin mining can be done anywhere where there is cheap electricity. So bitcoin mining operations can be conducted not where people are (banking) or where government is (fiat cash) or where gold is (gold mining)—it can be done everywhere where there is cheap electricity
Some miners are flocking to the heat of the Texan desert where gas is virtually available for free, thanks to another oil revolution.
Other miners go to places where there is cheap wind, water, or other renewable energy.
This is because they don’t have to build bank branches, printing presses, and government buildings, or need to put up excavators and conveyor belts to dig gold out of the ground.
All they need is internet access and a home for the computers that look like a shipping container, each one of which has around 200 specialized bitcoin mining computers in them.
“The good thing about bitcoin mining is that it doesn’t matter where on earth a transaction happens, we can verify it in our data center here. The miners are part of the decentralized philosophy of bitcoin, it’s completely independent of your location as well,” said Moritz Jäger, chief technology officer at bitcoin Mining company Northern Bitcoin AG.

Centralized Mining

But so far, this decentralization hasn’t worked out as well as it sounds in theory.
Because Chinese local governments had access to subsidized electricity, it was profitable for officials to cut deals with bitcoin mining companies and supply them with cheap electricity in exchange for jobs and cutbacks. Sometimes the prices were as low as 2 dollar cents to 4 dollar cents per kilowatt hour.
This is why the majority of bitcoin mining is still concentrated in China (around 70 percent) where it was the most profitable, but only because the Chinese central planners subsidized the price of electricity.
This set up led to the by and large unwanted result that the biggest miner of bitcoin, a company called Bitmain, is also the biggest manufacturer of specialized computing equipment for bitcoin mining. The company reported revenues of $2.8 billion for the first half of 2018.

Tourists walk on the dunes near a power plant in Xiangshawan Desert in Ordos of Inner Mongolia, in this file photo. bitcoin miners have enjoyed favorable electricity rates in places like Ordos for a long time. (Feng Li/Getty Images)Centralized mining is a problem because whenever there is one player or a conglomerate of players who control more than 50 percent of the network computing power, they could theoretically crash the network by spending the same bitcoin twice, the so called “double spending problem.“
They don’t have an incentive to do so because it would probably ruin the bitcoin price and their business, but it’s better not to have to rely on one group of people controlling an entire money system. After all, we have that exact same system with central banking and bitcoin was set up as a decentralized alternative.
So far, no player or conglomerate ever reached that 51 percent threshold, at least not since bitcoin’s very early days, but many market participants always thought Bitmain’s corner of the market is a bit too close for comfort.
This favorable environment for Chinese bitcoin mining has been changing with a crack down on local government electricity largess as well as a crackdown on cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin itself and mining bitcoin remain legal in China but cryptocurrency exchanges have been banned since late 2017.
But more needs to be done for bitcoin to become independent of the caprice of a centralized oppressive regime and local government bureaucrats.

Northern Bitcoin Case Study

Enter Northern Bitcoin AG. The company isn’t the only one which is exploring mining opportunities with renewable energies in locations other than China.
But it is special because of the extraordinary set up it has for its operations, the fact that it is listed on the stock exchange in Germany, and the opportunities for scaling it discovered.
The operations of Northern Bitcoin combine the beauties of bitcoin and capitalism in one.
Like Texas has a lot of oil and free gas and it makes sense to use the gas rather than burn it, Norway has a lot of water, especially water moving down the mountains due to rainfall and melting snow.
And it makes sense to use the power of the movement of the water, channel it through pipes into generators to create very cheap and almost unlimited electricity. Norway generates north of 95 percent of its total electricity from hydropower.

A waterfall next to a hydropowerplant near Sandane, Norway, Oct. 25, 2018. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)Capitalism does not distinguish between renewable and fossil. It uses what is the most expedient. In this case, it is clearly water in Norway, and gas in Texas.
As a side note on the beauties of real capital and the fact that capital and the environment need not be enemies, the water in one of the hydropowerplants close to the Northern Bitcoin facility is piped through a generator made in 1920 by J.M. Voith AG, a company from Heidenheim Germany.
The company was established in 1867 and is still around today. The generator was produced in 1920 and is still producing electricity today.

Excess Power

In the remote regions of Northern Norway, there aren’t that many people or industry who would use the electricity. And rather than transport it over hundreds of miles to the industrial centers of Europe, the industries of the future are moving to Norway to the source of the cheap electricity.
Of course, it is not just bitcoin mining, but other data and computing heavy operations like server farms for cloud computing that can be neatly packaged into one of those containers and shipped up north.
“The containers are beautiful. They are produced in the middle of Germany where the hardware is enabled and tested. Then we put it on a truck and send it up here. When the truck arrives on the outside we lift it on the container vehicle. Two hours after the container arrives, it’s in the container rack. And 40 hours later we enable the cooling, network, power, other systems, and it’s online,” said Mats Andersson, a spokesman for the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway, where Northern Bitcoin has its operations. Plug and play.

A Northern Bitcoin data container inside the Lefdal Mine data center, in Måløy, Norway. (Northern Bitcoin)If the cheap electricity wasn’t enough—around 5 cents per kilowatt hour compared to 17 cents in Germany—Norway also provides the perfect storage for these data containers, which are normally racked up in open air parks above the ground.
Also here, the resource allocation is beautiful. Instead of occupying otherwise useful and beautiful parcels of land and nature, the Northern Bitcoin containers and others are stored in the old Lefdal olivine mine.
Olivine is a mineral used for steel production and looks green. Very fitting. Hence also the name of the data center: Lefdal Mine.
“We take the green mineral out and we take the green IT in,” said Andersson.

Efficiency, Efficiency

Using the old mine as storage for the data center makes the whole process even more resource efficient.
Why? So far, we’ve only been talking about bitcoin mining using a lot of energy. But what for? Before you have actually seen the process in action—and it is similar for other computing operations—you cannot imagine how bizarre it is.
Most of the electricity is used to prevent the computers from overheating. So it’s not even the processors themselves; it’s the fans which cool the computer that use the most juice.
This is where the mine helps, because it’s rather cool 160 meters (525 feet) below sea level; certainly cooler than in the Texas desert.
But it gets even better. On top of the air blow-cooling the computer, the Lefdal data center uses a fresh water system to pump through the containers in pipes.
The fans can then circulate air over the cool pipes which transfer the heat to the water. One can feel the difference when touching the different pipes.
The fresh water closed circle loop then completes the “green” or resource efficiency cycle by transferring its heat to ice cold water from the nearby Fjord.
The water is sucked in through a pipe from the Fjord, the heat gets transferred without the water being mixed, and the water flows back to the Fjord, without any impact on the environment.
To top it all off, the mine has natural physical security far better than open air data centers and is even protected from an electromagnetic pulse blast because it’s underground.

_The Nordfjord near Måløy, Norway. The Lefdal data center takes the cold water from the fjord and uses it to cool the computer inside the mine. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)_Company Dynamics

Given this superlative set up, Northern Bitcoin wants to ramp up production as fast as possible at the Lefdal mine and other similar places in Norway, which have more mountains where data centers can be housed.
At the moment, Northern Bitcoin has 15 containers with 210 mining machines each. The 15 containers produce around 5 bitcoin per day at a total cost of around $2,500 dollars at the end of November 2018 and after the difficulty of solving the math problems went down by ~17 percent.
Most of it is for electricity; the rest is for leasing the containers, renting the mine space, buying and writing off the mining computers, personnel, overhead, etc.
Even at the current relatively depressed prices of around $4000, that’s a profit of $1500 per bitcoin or $7,500 per day.
But the goal is to ramp it up to 280 containers until 2019, producing 100 bitcoin per day. Again, the company is in the sweet spot to do this.
As opposed to the beginning of the year when one could not procure a mining computer from Bitmain even if one’s life depended on it, the current bear market has made them cheap and relatively available both new and second had from miners who had to cease operations because they can’t produce at low bitcoin prices.

Northern Bitcoin containers inside the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway. (Northern Bitcoin)What about the data shipping containers? They are manufactured by a company called Rittal who is the world market leader. So it helps that the owner of Rittal also owns 30 percent of the Lefdal mine, providing preferential access to the containers.
Northern Bitcoin said it has enough capital available for the intermediate goal of ramping up to 50 containers until the end of year but may tap the capital markets again for the next step.
The company can also take advantage of the lower German corporate tax rate because revenue is only recorded when the bitcoin are sold in Germany, not when they are mined in Norway.
Of course, every small-cap stock—especially bitcoin companies—have their peculiarities and very high risks. As an example, Northern Bitcoin’s financial statements, although public, aren’t audited.
The equipment in the Lefdal mine in Norway is real and the operations are controlled by the Lefdal personnel, but one has to rely on exclusive information from the company for financials and cost figures, so buyer beware.

Norway Powerhouse?

Northern Bitcoin wants to have 280 containers, representing around 5 percent of the network’s computing power.
But the Lefdal mine alone has a capacity to power and cool 1,500 containers in a 200 megawatt facility, once it is fully built out.
“Here you have all the space, power, and cooling that you need. … Here you can grow,” said Lefdal’s Andersson.

A mine shaft in the Lefdal Mine data center in Måløy, Norway. The whole mine will have a capacity for 1500 containers once fully built out. (Valentin Schmid/The Epoch Times)The Norwegian government was behind an initiative to bring computing power to Norway and make it one of the prime destinations for data centers at the beginning of this decade.
To that effect, the local governments own part of the utility companies which operate the power plants and own part of the Lefdal Mine and other locations. But even without notable subsidies (i.e. cash payments to companies), market players were able to figure it out, for everybody’s benefit.
The utilities win because they can sell their cheap electricity close to home. The computing companies like IBM and Northern Bitcoin win because they can get cheap electricity, storage, and security. Data center operators like Lefdal win because they can charge rent for otherwise unused and unneeded space.
However, in a recent about face, the central government in Oslo has decided to remove cryptocurrency miners from the list of companies which pay a preferential tax rate on electricity consumption.
Normally, energy intensive companies, including data centers, pay a preferential tax on electricity consumed of 0.48 øre ($0.00056 ). According to a report by Norwegian media Aftenposten, this tax will rise to 16.58 øre ($0.019) in 2019 for cryptocurrency miners exclusively.
The argument by left wing politician Lars Haltbrekken who sponsored the initiative: “Norway cannot continue to provide huge tax incentives for the most dirty form of cryptocurrency output […] [bitcoin] requires a lot of energy and generates large greenhouse gas emissions globally.”
Since Norway generates its electricity using hydro, precisely the opposite is true: No greenhouse gas emissions, or any emissions for that matter would be produced, if all cryptomining was done in Norway. As opposed to China, where mining is done with coal and with emissions.
But not only in Norway is the share of renewable and emission free energy high. According to research by Coinshares, Bitcoin’s consumes about 77.6 percent of its energy in the form of renewables globally.
However self-defeating the arguments against bitcoin mining in Norway, the political initiative is moving forward. What it means for Northern Bitcoin is not clear, as they house their containers in Lefdal’s mixed data center, which also has other clients, like IBM.
“It’s not really decided yet; there are still big efforts from IT sectors and parties who are trying to change it. If the decision is taken it might apply for pure crypto sites rather than mixed data centers, like ours,” said Lefdal’s Andersson.
Even in the worst-case scenario, it would mean an increase from ~5 cents to ~6.9 cents per kilowatt hour, or 30 percent more paid on the electricity by Northern Bitcoin, which at ~$3250 would still rank it among the most competitive producers in the world.
Coinshares estimates the average production price at $6,800 per Bitcoin at $0,05 per kilowatt hour of electricity and an 18-months depreciation schedule, but concedes that a profitable miner could “[depreciate] mining gear over 24-30 months, or [pay] less for mining gear than our estimates.”
Jäger says Northern Bitcoin depreciates the equipment over three years and has obtained very favorable prices from Bitmain, making its production much more competitive than the average despite the same cost of electricity. In addition, the natural cooling in the mine also reduces electricity costs overall.

Cheap Producer Advantage

At the moment, however, the tax could be the least of any miners worry, as the bitcoin price is in free-fall.
But what happens when the price crashes further? Suffice it to say that there was bitcoin mining when the dollar price was less than 1 cent and there will be bitcoin mining at lower prices thanks to the design of the network.
Mao Shixing, the founder of mining pool F2pool estimated 600,000 miners have shut down since the November crash in price, according to a report by Coindesk.
As it should be in a competitive system, the most energy intensive and obsolete machines are shut down first.
As with every other commodity, when the price drops, some miners will leave the market, leaving space for cheaper competitors to capture a bigger share. But with bitcoin this is a bit simpler than with copper or gold for example.
When a big copper player goes bankrupt, its competitors have to ramp up production and increase cost to increase their market share. With bitcoin, if 3,000 computers get taken off the total mining pool, they won’t be able to mine the approximately 5 bitcoin any longer.
However, because the difficulty of solving the computationally intensive cryptographic tasks of bitcoin decreases automatically when there are fewer computers engaged in the task, the other players just have to leave their machines running at the same rate for the same cost and they will split the 5 bitcoin among them.
“The moment the price goes down, our production price will go down as well,” said Jäger, a process that already happened from November to December when the difficulty decreased twice in November and the beginning of December.
This naturally favors players like Northern Bitcoin, which are producing at the lower end of the cost spectrum. They will be the ones who shut down last.
And this is a good thing. The more companies like Northern Bitcoin, and countries like Norway—even with the extra tax—the more decentralized the bitcoin system.
The more computers there are in different hands mining bitcoin, the more secure the system becomes, because it will be ever more difficult for one player to reach the 50 percent threshold to crash the system. It is this decentralized philosophy which has kept the bitcoin system running for 10 years. Whether at $1 or $20,000.
submitted by rotoreuters to zerohedge [link] [comments]

CRYPTOCURRENCY MINING AT IT VERY BEST

Hello guys, this my latest article review and am going to share something amazing with you today. Blockchain has played a major role online as it seems to be gaining more popularity every now and then. The blockchain is known for its undisruptive services, management of peer-2-peer network and many more. Blockchain was invented in 2008 by Satoshi Nakamoto that serves as public transaction ledger of cryptocurrency bitcoin. The invention of Blockchain actually made it possible for bitcoin to be the first digital currency that solved problems without involving authority or center server. Also, Blockchain which is legible through the general public is broadly utilized by cryptocurrencies.
Cryptocurrency is a digital asset designed as a medium of change that determines the use of strong cryptography to secure monetary transactions, controls the introduction of similar devices, and affirm the transfer of an asset. Cryptocurrencies are kind of digital and alternate currency, cryptocurrencies use localized management as critical centralized digital foreign currencies and important banking system. In other words, the cryptocurrency network could be were mining validates transactions. Nevertheless, miners collect new cryptocurrency as a legacy.
For this the reward decrease group movement prices with the aids of making a complementary encouragement to contribute to the technical strength of the network.
THE PLATFORM
Scavo is a decentralized blockchain platform which offers to mine in cryptocurrencies thereby, allowing mining operations very necessary, through the Scavo technologies which want to eliminate energy cost which will have a self-own power generation station. Mining cryptocurrencies in the process will be smart and it will be a long-term investment for alternatives. The new innovation features autonomous mining systems which are
MINING CENTER: This process feature a lot of mining system which requires all necessary hardware used in carrying out mining operation. For all equipment and others, important tools are built in a high standard to suit the miner's taste.
REFRIGERATION: This plays an important role in terms of needing a well modernized cooling system. This system is just to reduce energy consumption cost.
SUPPLY: The most important of all it is the supply of energy in the system. Without energy, I don’t think the system can work well. They have eliminated the issue by receiving and using energy from different sources.
OVERVIEW
Scavo technology is a cool system in cryptocurrencies mining, for a huge industry like this, the number of energy consumptions cost is fluctuating. Data server center is a long-term infrastructure hence, the energy market is able to adapt to a change in price structure as well as a limited capacity. The amount of electricity required is a very large amount on its network.
There is two actual Based model on its system, they are basically important. Primary and secondary operations.
PRIMARY OPERATION (PO): This set is known to give profit gotten from the mining operation products. Whereas in this certain operation investors have all the legal right to receive 100% profit from its operations.
SECONDARY OPERATIONS (SO): they are major utilities that are not used by the primary operations. A certain amount of profit will be given investors but are short by 30%
FINAL THOUGHT
Overall I could say that mining cryptocurrencies have finally been solved so that investors can be a part of all. Profits will be shared evenly and all will surely benefit from it.
For more exclusive information, click on the link. Thanks.
Username: kelvinkent
https://scavo.farm/
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=4832322.0
Bitcointalk profile URL: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=2313436
submitted by AdmirableBill to u/AdmirableBill [link] [comments]

BitFury Tbilisi Introduces New Cooling System

BitFury, a crypto mining equipment manufacturer, is now using low environmental impact refrigeration technology to maintain crypto-mining equipment at its mining farm in Tbilisi. It entails a method of immersing Bitcoin mining devices in tanks containing a non-conductive liquid to keep them cold.
The system was designed and created by Allied Control Ltd., an engineering company based in Hong Kong, which was acquired by BitFury in 2015. The director of the firm, Valery Vavilov, said they first thought about this type of technology when they realized that the data centers would be used both for Internet searches and to secure Bitcoin (BTC) blockchain.
Vavilov also announced that BitFury is betting that this technology will be in high demand from cloud computing companies in urban areas.
This immersion cooling technology has been on the market for some time and has had several uses. The fluids have been used to cool servers, and have even been used to extinguish race car fires. The system involves submerging hardware in an open liquid coolant tank with a low boiling point. Once the equipment gets hot, the fluid boils, becoming steam which rises and condenses on a water-cooled coil, and then finally it returns to the tank. This cycle results in energy savings of 95%, depending on the company’s size, and with minimal fluid loss.
These systems are gaining popularity and are likely to replace some of the techniques used by crypto mining farms, which include dipping their miners in oil tanks.
submitted by SwitchKanun to hashflareinfo [link] [comments]

Mining. What will the “arms race” lead to?

The ten-year history of the blockchain has gradually convinced world experts that this phenomenon can still become the starting point for the transformation of the entire world economy. Perhaps this is still not a revolution and the technology is far from perfect.
But the main thing is that the precedent has been created and the development of alternatives in this direction is going on by leaps and bounds. The financial sphere is not the only one where the incentives are created by blockchain. A powerful infrastructure is built around it with attempts to implement technology into other spheres of human life. The production of crypto-currency, known to everyone as mining is one of such means. Cryptocurrency is the collective noun for digital currencies created on the basis of blockchain technology. For encryption, there is a special principle of cryptography, which protects information about transactions from theft and counterfeiting.
Mining is the process of cryptographic calculations with a use of special equipment. For Bitcoin and many other cryptocurrencies, it is the only way to maintain the integrity and workability of the system. Here is a brief description of the operating principle for the newcomers. Technology creates the ability to transfer value (information) from one user to another. At the same time, the transfer of non-existent value and the transfer of one unit to several addressees are excluded. The key to this is a large number of participants in the system and the economic motivation of the miners. Once a transaction is initiated in the system, it becomes visible to all participants. This transparency is both the main feature and the advantage of blockchain. No transaction is considered committed until the information about it gets into the so-called block and will be confirmed several times – this is the function that the miners provide. For a block to be considered generated, the program must compute a hash function – a unique alphanumeric code that contains information about the previous block. Thus, the distributed database in the blockchain is a chain of blocks, each of which refers to the previous one and stores the history of all transactions that occurred since the first coin appeared. Once the block takes its place in the chain, the miner who generated it receives a cryptocurrency reward – this is how coins are issued. In addition, the miners receive a commission from each transaction.
Blockchain – the technology of recording and storing information, when data is written in a continuous chain of blocks. It is based on the principle of distributed registries - information is copied and stored not on one server, but on all computers that are part of the blockchain system.
Now let's take a quick look at the evolution of mining, touching only the significant events. It all began in 2008, when an unknown programmer published a document on the network describing the algorithm of the quasi-monetary tool based on the technology of the blockchain. According to the published algorithm of Satoshi Nakamoto, the author of the document, the remuneration of the miners is reduced by 50% every 210 thousand of mined blocks. At that time, each newly generated block brought 50 new coins. Now more than 477 thousand blocks have been generated, and the reward for each new one has fallen to 12.5 BTC. It is expected that by 2140 year the reward will be so small that the issue will virtually stop and the volume of bitcoins will not exceed 21 million BTC. According to the idea of the creator, this will protect the cryptocurrency from inflation. It is unknown now whether Satoshi assumed or not how quickly his offspring would grow up. Mining on PC processors, the most massive chips in the world, supposed to make Bitcoin truly decentralized and popular. But for a while it still remained only the entertainment of geeks and enthusiasts. By 2010, the both Bitcoin exchange rate and popularity had grown so much that its mining started to yield a small income. Mining began to move to commercial sphere and the rivalry triggered technological race.
The Global Cryptocurrency Benchmarking Study research has shown that since Bitcoin appeared, the miners have earned more than $2 billion on mining and $14 billion on commissions from transactions.
In the summer of that year, a mining farm was first launched on the GPU and the first block was mined using parallel computations. Since then, the age of industrial mining began. Having smelt the money, miners around the world rushed to buy computer graphics cards. Despite the constant increase in equipment costs and attendant maintenance problems, the mining farms continue to attract new followers even now. According to the growing complexity of the cryptocurrency mining, pools, the miner unions, began to form. For one block search, a large number of farms with a high capacity are used, and the reward is divided due to the "labor participation" in it. The power consumption of one GPU is about 200 W, the average power of a medium farm is comparable or even higher than the equipment index in the data center. The problem of energy supply, as well as the noise level and heat that the equipment produces, does not allow the creation of large farms at home. For these reasons, mining has moved to warehousing areas where there is no problem with either noise or cooling, and electricity is available at industrial tariffs. The competition in the niche of the mining farms continues to increase, bringing new profits to the component manufacturers.
Farm is a data center that combines several video cards (GPUs). It shows high computing power, which allows several cryptocurrencies to be mined simultaneously.
In 2011, it became obvious that GPU farms consume too much electricity, require constant attention and additional costs. Enthusiasts were searching for solutions to reduce these expenses. The third mining business development iteration led to the appearance of miners on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chips. Such devices were quite expensive, but much more compact, stable and more energy efficient than the GPU farms. Energy consumption save was thousands of percent. But still, video cards remained the mass solution. Most likely the niche specialization of such machines was the impediment to their popularity. FPGA-miners did not last long and remained a niche product, which did not play a significant role in mass mining. But the developments of manufacturers of these devices were useful to ASIC-miners, which became the next generation of equipment for cryptocurrency mining. Unlike FPGAs, which are used for a variety of tasks, ASIC chips (Application Specific Integrated Cirquit) were designed to perform only one task. But they perform it much better than any farm. The difference in performance of similar devices makes tens of times. However, there is also a downside, which prevents the mass distribution of ASIC-miners - zero liquidity in the secondary market. They work according to the algorithm, which allows mining of only three cryptocurrencies known today. The production of this specific equipment lasts even now, but all producers have problems with delivery. This is indicated by the general complaints of customers at specialized forums. In the context of battered cryptocurrency rate, this factor strongly inhibits their sales. The "arms race" being an endless capacity build-up has reached the level when the most popular cryptocurrency mining is no longer economically justified. The current size of one Bitcoin block is 1 MB, which allows the system to process no more than seven transactions per second. Visa or MasterCard payment systems witness such index to reach about two thousand, with capacity expenses being several times lower. This makes the entire system clumsy and inconvenient, and increasing the commission from each transaction for the miners can ruin the Bitcoin economy, as well as any other coin economy.
ASIC – processors are manufactured with a special mining-friendly architecture. Such devices have a high payback rate and are easy to maintain. Among cons are low liquidity in the secondary market and rapid ASIC outdate due to the growing complexity of the network.
A complexity increase obviously cannot last forever and, sooner or later, there must be a transition to the next level. And this is the turning point where many questions may appear. What is the possible way of blockchain and mining development? This is important to understand, because an equipment worth hundreds of millions is at stake! What if it suddenly becomes useless? There are several assumptions. The first way is to reduce costs. Some hopes for this are provided by the development of alternative energy. Receiving freemium energy will reduce the cost of mining. This issue is regularly discussed on specialized forums. The creation of farms using solar, wind and geothermal power is still only at the stage of the concept. There have not been any major projects implemented. Due to the fact that the cost of equipment is still large, the entry threshold with such systems is very high, and the payback of equipment is still slow and thus risky. It is unlikely that this will become mainstream for the next five years, but the possibility of a breakthrough technology that makes renewable energy available, still exists. The second possible script is the abandonment of mining as a phenomenon. Bitcoin, which implies the efficiency of mining depending directly on the equipment productivity, uses the Proof-of-Work protocol. Some cryptocurrencies use the Proof-of-Stake protocol. They do not imply mining as a mandatory process at all. The system exists due to the circulation of cryptocurrency among users. By the way, this protocol is the one that Ethereum platform is planning to move to. This has already been stated by Vitalik Buterin, the creator of Ethereum: "When we move to the Proof-of-Stake protocol, the need for ether mining will drop sharply even at the first stage. Proof-of-Stake uses an algorithm which does not require that a large number of computers constantly make calculations. This is an algorithm where a coin is used inside the platform itself. The consensus will become much cheaper and safer. And in fact, miners can lose their business." Imagine the joy of computer gamers when suddenly the CPU prices fall dramatically! Now it is too early to speak about panic, but if the creators of other cryptocurrencies will consider this... The third way is to reduce the complexity of computation in the blockchain due to the use of alternative protocols of cryptography. Some industry enthusiasts are already working on such projects. If the complexity of the calculations goes beyond the reasonable, then why not change the operation of the system in general? So did, for example, the creators of Blockchain Ventureon.
Anton Sobor, the BDM of Ventureon, claimed: "The complexity of mining is laid by the blockchain creators themselves. What are they motivated by while creating such complicated algorithms? The answer remains unclear. The complexity has inconsiderable affect on safety. Creating our project, we proceed from the personal experience of our cryptography specialists, as well as from the principle of "necessary is enough". All the functions of the blockchain are preserved, with security only increasing, and complexity decreasing prominently."
It is also interesting that Ventureon mining does not require GPU. It is planned instead to create server-side mining pools, probably for easier and less expensive connection of the miners. This is likely to become a great advantage over another farms.
Of course, these are not all possible ways of mining industry development, but only the most vivid and obvious directions. There is one thing to say for sure. Mining being a mass business will exist only if the rate of specific cryptocurrencies increases. And this, in turn, depends on whether the blockchain will be accepted into the world economic system, as an alternative financial tool. The attempts to regulate the circulation of cryptocurrency at the level of individual states cause a strong resonance of the crypto community. That is perfectly visible on fluctuations of the rates of the basic cryptocurrencies. But, in my opinion, it is not possible to strangle the initiative of enthusiasts completely. The point of no return has been already reached. Blockchain as a phenomenon has been proved to be effective and will develop further, influencing the society strongly. And only time will tell what its future will be.
submitted by VentureOnICO to crypto_mining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Private mining pool https://www.bitpoolmining.com

Bitcoin Private mining pool https://www.bitpoolmining.com
 
Hello fellow BTCP nerds. We are a group of 4 software developers that are all miners. We decided to use our development background to start a pool and slowly add features that we wanted to see in other pools. Any feedback or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. We have also built an open source GPU mining/monitoring software app that we call BPM that is also BTCP compatible https://bitpoolmining.com/bpm. Our goal has been to build cool software and to help the community whenever we can. We set out to build software for 'one click mining' that can help ease setup for BTCP mining for new/small miners and also provide tools powerful enough for mining farms.
 
Some neat pics:
 
Pool details:
 
 
BPM GPU monitor app details:
 
 
BTCP Connection Info:
 
Stratum Server:  
 us-east.btcp.bitpoolmining.com 
Ports:  
3060 – GPU MINERS (Vardiff enabled) 3061 – ASIC MINERS (Vardiff enabled) 3062 – Nicehash (Vardiff enabled with min difficulty) 
  Username: YourBTCPAddress.YourWorkerName  
 Example: b1Rwkc2PYb66DJ7bznqFjJdKcxPMbG6FbS8.RIG01 
Password: Use "x"  
 **Password is ignored by BitPoolMining Servers** 
 
Chat with us on Discord https://discord.gg/gxvyJuA
edit: full disclosure, I am one of the pool owners, developer and operator.
 
double ninja edit: If this is the wrong place to post, please let me know, I don't want to be spammy.
submitted by salty_miner to BTC_Private [link] [comments]

The Toomin brothers, Bitcoin Classic's main devs are debating Core devs and trying to show them the light. It gets quite fishy at the end.

Join here: http://slack.bitcoincore.org
Start somewhere here: https://bitcoincore.slack.com/archives/general/p1453096627008444
Some extracts:
Michael Toomim [8:06 AM] Satoshi believed the only way to prevent control is to give everyone a copy of the ledger.
[8:06] Give everyone an opportunity to vote.
eric-ledger [8:06 AM] @mtoomim: I think you are delusional
Michael Toomim [8:06 AM] Give everyone an opportunity to transact.
anduck [8:06 AM] mtoomim: bitcoin classic is against that, too.
[8:06] as you very well know.(edited)
Michael Toomim [8:06 AM] We give everyone an opportunity to upgrade the protocol.
Adam Back [8:06 AM] mtoomim: do you understand why the developers of bitcoin used to propose a HF but switched to a SF once it became clear that it was possible because it is safer and faster?
Michael Toomim [8:06 AM] You can take part in bitcoin.
[8:06] You can add yourself to it.
[8:06] Express yourself on consider.it.
anduck [8:06 AM] are you a bot?
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] Are you a bot?
dts [8:07 AM] I'm convinced, I welcome our new pot smoking master
James Hillard [8:07 AM] @opet: when did I ever refer to you as being part of the uneducated masses?
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] Do you wanna speak bot? Bleep Bleep Bloop!
[8:07] 1010111
Adam Back [8:07 AM] opet: "it's an image and communication problem." this is agreed
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] What's your favorite wave? Mine's triangle.
eric-ledger [8:07 AM] you sound like a cultist
anduck [8:07 AM] mtoomim: quit advertising your platform
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] Haha I'm just stoned guys.
Adam Back [8:07 AM] lol
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] Cultists do get stoned a lot.
[8:07] But I'm just stoned.
Adam Back [8:07 AM] mtoomim: are you serious?
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] You're mistaking correlation with causation.
dts [8:07 AM] If any miners are here, please pay attention to @mtoomim words
Michael Toomim [8:07 AM] Yes I'm serious. Do you not believe me? Test me!
anduck [8:08 AM] mtoomim: so how much did you pay the miners? 0 or more
Michael Toomim [8:08 AM] I'd love more attention. I love attention!
[8:08] What? I ​am​ the miner!
[8:08] https://toom.im Toomim Bros. Bitcoin Mining Concern Toomim Bros. provides hosting for bitcoin mining. Our mining center is powered by some of the most wallet- and climate-friendly power in the world.
eric-ledger [8:08 AM] meltdown
anduck [8:08 AM] as stated earlier, it's a valid concern that you may have paid miners. you offered money to other to do things that people have been doing for NO money earlier.
Michael Toomim [8:08 AM] I pay myself every day.
anduck [8:08 AM] @mtoomim: did the miners get paid to express support for Classic or not?
Adam Back [8:08 AM] mtoomim: are you literally stoned? you may want to unplug for a while.
Nicolas Bacca [8:09 AM] At that point I think the best course of action is to demonstrate to the miners that segwit works well with multiple wallets and that well, one team is slightly more serious than the other one.
Michael Toomim [8:09 AM] No they didn't get paid. Duh. The miners have all the money. They are the ones who pay.
dts [8:09 AM] It is legal in Washington State as far as I know
taek [8:09 AM] @mtoomim: you keep trying to flatter us. We don't work for free. We are not impressed with the direction you are taking things and we don't feel inclined to work on your vision. Ours is in the process of being shredded to pieces, why do you think we will maintain morale and motivation?
James Hillard [8:09 AM] I hardly consider a sub MW mining operation to be much of anything at this point.
taek [8:09 AM] ugh
anduck [8:09 AM] mtoomim: thanks
Michael Toomim [8:09 AM] Yeah it's legal here. 1
Colin Delargy [8:09 AM] I don’t think I could think of something more off topic. 1
Michael Toomim [8:09 AM] @taek I don't give the vision. YOU give the vision. Come give it.
[8:09] I just create a place for you to talk and listen.
dts [8:09 AM] @mtoomim: you really aren't doing yourself any favors
Michael Toomim [8:10 AM] I'm hosting the forum.
eric-ledger [8:10 AM] this is insane
p2phash [8:10 AM] funny though
dts [8:10 AM] I hope this is saved for posterity
Adam Back [8:10 AM] mtoomim: i dont think yes. i think you should go sleep it off.
Michael Toomim [8:10 AM] This is great! I love this conversation guys!
eric-ledger [8:10 AM] doe anyone know for sure he is the real Michael Toomim?
Michael Toomim [8:10 AM] You are real fun.
dts [8:10 AM] he verified his email as the same one on Classic Slack
Michael Toomim [8:10 AM] Nobody texted me.
[8:10] :stuck_out_tongue:
gamersg [8:10 AM] mtoomim: If SW via SF increases effective block size to 2MB, why are you pushing for a 2MB HF (honest qsn)
Michael Toomim [8:10 AM] Text me a random code at +++++++++++++
Adam Back [8:11 AM] eric-ledger: oh maybe it's a look alike account.
dts [8:11 AM] why do you have an Oakland number
Michael Toomim [8:11 AM] Because the people who voted aren't pushing for it.
[8:11] I went to school at uc berkeley.
Colin Delargy [8:11 AM] content style matches https://www.reddit.com/usetoomim reddit: the front page of the internet
p2phash [8:11 AM] @gamersg: not a full 2mb of transactions really is it?
anduck [8:11 AM] gamersg: that's been asked like hundred times. he refuses to answer.
taek [8:11 AM] I do feel like I've been properly baited. @mtoomim: my vision is a cryptocurrency that is immune to political influence. That vision does not seem to be present in the current ecosystem
Michael Toomim [8:11 AM] @dts are you nearby?
dts [8:11 AM] that explains the pot
Michael Toomim [8:12 AM] haha Yeah it does.
[8:12] And acid
judahmu [8:12 AM] we liked dts better as luke-jr
dts [8:12 AM] I'm flattered
James Hillard [8:12 AM] Is this what future bitcoin development conversations are going to look like? 1
dts [8:12 AM] Yes he is the real deal, not a troll, kind of unbelievable
James Hillard [8:13 AM] This is insane
oneeman [8:13 AM] tomorrow is a holiday
taek [8:13 AM] :}
dts [8:13 AM] He did go to UC berkeley and slack sends you an email to verify it
oneeman [8:13 AM] as good a day as any to cut loose, I guess
drdave [8:14 AM] joined #general
Adam Back [8:15 AM] are we sure mtoomim is actually michael toomim? wasnt it toomim before?
anduck [8:15 AM] it's michael toomim
[8:15] changed nick to mtoomim
Brian Hoffman [8:15 AM] What a cluster fuck
Michael Toomim [8:15 AM] @taek There are politics in every social system. Our job is to improve them. That's why we made Bitcoin Classic. The problem with politics is that they get in the way, and so make political communication more efficient, so it gets out of the way.
Adam Back [8:16 AM] anduck: well he said that, but what if that itself was a spoof?
anduck [8:16 AM] @adam3us: the email looks legit, at least
Adam Back [8:16 AM] mtoomim: what hashrate does toom.im have?
Michael Toomim [8:16 AM] We are the first forum that can visualize over 1,000 opinions on a single page.
dts [8:16 AM] less than 1%
Michael Toomim [8:16 AM] We scale.
Adam Back [8:16 AM] so email him a code see if he can answer it?
Luke-Jr [8:16 AM] what's the invite link again?
Michael Toomim [8:16 AM] @adam3us: We only have a small amount. Most of our capacity goes to customers who host with us.
Adam Back [8:16 AM] slack.bitcoincore.org
Michael Toomim [8:17 AM] We have 750 kW of power capacity.
dino_m [8:17 AM] joined #general
dts [8:17 AM] @btcdrak: should put it on the front page of bitcoincore.org :confused:
Luke-Jr [8:17 AM] thx. what is the share rules for this link?
dts [8:17 AM] it's posted already on there just hidden behind "contribute"
Luke-Jr [8:17 AM] k, so public
Michael Toomim [8:17 AM] So you can multiply 750 kW by the average efficiency to get the hashrate at our facility.
kang [8:18 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:18 AM] Text me it's faster.
Patrick Strateman [8:18 AM] @mtoomim: well divide by x and carry the... <1%
oneeman [8:18 AM] someone in ##bitcoin asked a day or two ago if maybe bitcoin classic was just a viral marketing ploy for consider.it ... 2
Michael Toomim [8:18 AM] Probably
anduck [8:19 AM] oneeman: well it certainly looks like so
[8:19] mtoomim has advertised it like 10 times in an hour
oneeman [8:19 AM] I thought the question was a joke, but now I'm not so sure
anduck [8:19 AM] and nobody still cares about it.
Michael Toomim [8:19 AM] And we're all a viral marketing campaign for bitcoin! 2
Patrick Strateman [8:19 AM] @oneeman: lold
Michael Toomim [8:19 AM] Ok what am I not answering now?
anduck [8:19 AM] mtoomim: read the log.
[8:19] please.
Michael Toomim [8:19 AM] Come on!
Adam Back [8:19 AM] mtoomim: nice. yes coincidentally i had looked at your hosting service for some miners i had a while back.
Michael Toomim [8:19 AM] It's so long
[8:19] You talk fast
[8:20] I've responded very well to everything I've been able to tackle
anduck [8:20 AM] you're already deeming others to do the btc deving work for you, don't make us read the logs you should read(edited)
Michael Toomim [8:20 AM] I want you to choose
[8:20] There are a lot of options up there
Patrick Strateman [8:20 AM] @mtoomim: Would you be OK with a world in which virtually all Bitcoin users run SPV clients and only a handful of trusted third parties operate full nodes?
alie1 [8:20 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:20 AM] You get power, you can choose what I talk about!
[8:20] Good question!
[8:21] Ok, so I need to answer this well. Give me these numbers:
  1. The percent of SPV clients
  2. The number of full nodes
[8:21] I'll give you my opinion.
James Hillard [8:21 AM] toomims hosting service is small peanuts in the scheme of things, I manage multiple MW scale large farms in multiple countries and even then have only about 1% of network hashpower
Michael Toomim [8:21 AM] Good job James!
[8:21] Congratulations!
epscy [8:22 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:22 AM] Hey can someone get Greg Maxwell? I love that guy!
Patrick Strateman [8:22 AM] @mtoomim: 100 full nodes run by say blockstream, coinbase, mit, etc etc everybody else runs spv clients
Michael Toomim [8:22 AM] I want him to work with Classic!
Adam Back [8:22 AM] mtoomim: i sent you an email to auth your slack handle here
dts [8:22 AM] yeah verify
Adam Back [8:22 AM] can you paste or type the code in
dts [8:23 AM] otherwise bravo on excellent trolling
taek [8:23 AM] @phantomcircuit: I don't think conversation with mtoomim is going to go anywhere.
Michael Toomim [8:23 AM] uploaded an image: Cool! Add Comment
dts [8:23 AM] it's listed as his email in the classic slack
Adam Back [8:23 AM] ok then. that's pretty confirmed.
Michael Toomim [8:23 AM] Fuck yeah it is!
Oliver [8:23 AM] @jameshilliard you inadvertently did so when you referred to those voting on consider.it and supporting Classic as the "uneducated masses."
After all, I didn't give up my anonymity and finally get involved with bitcoin dev in any way until Classic arrived on the scene.
There are many more exactly like me who have signed up to finally have our voices heard and votes counted. Some, like me, are incredibly sick of (and saddened) by the Core devs' seeming ignorance of the fact that it's NOT ok to completely ignore the wants of the community.
I'm here now, and I'm here to help. My greatest desire is to somehow help bring Core and Classic together with a compromise. I'd like to see collaboration and an understanding that the road map requires a lot more than Core's blessing.(edited)
Michael Toomim [8:23 AM] That's like, real!
[8:23] It'd be so hard for me to photoshop that in 50 seconds
[8:24] Photoshop sucks
[8:24] I can do better in omnigraffle
[8:24] and built-in OSX screenshotting
[8:24] @phantomcircuit: That scenario is fucked up, dude! Everybody runs an SPV client? Sounds like fucking fascist china man!
Luke-Jr [8:24 AM] considering how quickly my PR for Classic was shot down without discussion...
frankenmint [8:24 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:25 AM] I lived in china for 6 months man, it wasn't pretty with the government
[8:25] I'm so glad the chinese are finding freedom with bitcoin
eric-ledger [8:25 AM] @mtoomim: You should come back when you are not stoned; you are not helping yourself 3
Michael Toomim [8:25 AM] They need it!
Luke-Jr [8:25 AM] lol
dts [8:25 AM] uploaded an image: Here is his email listed in classic slack Add Comment Michael Toomim [8:25 AM] @eric-ledger: I'm loving this conversation!
[8:25] I'm here to help you guys!
eric-ledger [8:25 AM] well I do also love it
James Hillard [8:25 AM] @opet: I didn't mean to imply that everyone voting on there is uneducated.
Michael Toomim [8:25 AM] I want to make it easier to dev bitcoin!
eric-ledger [8:25 AM] but it may come back and bite you in the ass
Michael Toomim [8:26 AM] Haha
[8:26] That would be fun!
[8:26] Like a snake.
Patrick Strateman [8:26 AM] @mtoomim: Do you not realize that scenario is exactly the one you're moving towards with classic?
Michael Toomim [8:26 AM] Woah! No I don't!
[8:26] Please tell me how that's happening!
[8:26] How are we going to force everyone to use SPV clients?
[8:27] That means that we have to force people not to run a full node.
[8:27] Right now it's pretty easy to run a full node.
[8:27] I run one on this laptop.
[8:27] My laptop's only getting bigger and better every year.
[8:27] And the democracy cares about this!
[8:27] They won't let full nodes stop running on their laptops.
elliotolds [8:27 AM] @opet: what do you think as this (proposed earlier by someone else here) for a compromise: in April we hard fork to 2 MB, then we do segwit later in the year, maybe October or something, but whenever Core is comfortable releasing it? (sooner is fine, even along with the April HF is OK if they want it then)
Michael Toomim [8:27 AM] They want full nodes to run on their laptops!
[8:27] They want it so bad!
Patrick Strateman [8:27 AM] @mtoomim: so four or five tabs? 4
Michael Toomim [8:27 AM] I want it so bad!
[8:27] I love bitcoin on my laptop!
[8:28] It's like a girlfriend in your lap!
[8:28] Isn't it?
eric-ledger [8:28 AM] omg
Michael Toomim [8:28 AM] Who wants to relegate her to the server room?
dinbits [8:28 AM]
I'm here to help you guys! @mtoomim: Do you plan on saying anything helpful?(edited)
Michael Toomim [8:28 AM] That's for herems.
[8:28] I support sexual equality!
[8:28] @dinbits I want to be helpful! What would you like me to help you with?
jdebunt [8:28 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:28 AM] Or help other people with?
dts [8:29 AM] what he's saying is very illuminating to me 3
Michael Toomim [8:29 AM] @phantomcircuit: I once took 4 tabs and went free-diving off the coast of hawaii.
[8:29] Kapoho tide pools on the big island
[8:29] That was so great!
[8:29] I saw fish world.
[8:29] Like the clan of the little cute white fish with the red stripe that swish you left and right.
[8:29] I came up speaking in a new style. 1 1
justino [8:30 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:30 AM] Every once in a while my words would disiintegrate into strange snap crackle popping, the sounds of fish world.
[8:30] I called it a flubbergust.
[8:30] It is the moment where your spirit veers into void and disappears.
[8:30] It's when you are wrong.
[8:30] In Bitcoin, we have a problem of admitting when we're wrong.
[8:30] Because there's no data on it.
elliotolds [8:30 AM] I wonder if this is some sort of Machiavellian plot, and later Jonathan will come in here and seem like the most reasonable person in the world in comparison 3
Michael Toomim [8:30 AM] We're giving you social data.
[8:30] bitcoin.consider.it
Nathan Cook [8:30 AM] shh, this is great
Michael Toomim [8:30 AM] It tells you when you're right and wrong
[8:31] So that you can learn
[8:31] When you learn, you get better
[8:31] And you get shit done
[8:31] You can make changes to bitcoin
dts [8:31 AM] I still can't quite believe it's you even with the proof
Michael Toomim [8:31 AM] We are hardforking the blocksize limit to 2mb
[8:31] Join us.
anduck [8:31 AM] why not 6 mb?
Adam Back [8:31 AM] i think it's him
anduck [8:31 AM] it would allow more transactions
Michael Toomim [8:31 AM] @dts wanna video chat me?
Nicolas Bacca [8:31 AM] is there drug for everybody ?
dts [8:31 AM] like my mind can't make the two parts fit together
eric-ledger [8:31 AM] a selfie maybe?
Michael Toomim [8:31 AM] Guys come meet me in tawk.space. I'll be online in 5 minutes.
taek [8:31 AM] Things have gotten terribly off topic, I would like to request that people stop responding to the nonsense, and also stop encouraging it. There is more valuable conversation that is being blocked by the ridiculousness happening right now.
Michael Toomim [8:32 AM] That's https://tawk.space. Use chrome or go home.
dts [8:32 AM] let's rename this chat mtoomim's magical bus trip and make a new channel 4
kang [8:32 AM] Not before that selfie plz
Michael Toomim [8:33 AM] hahaha
jake7849 [8:33 AM] joined #general
alie1 [8:33 AM] is this a joke ?
jwade [8:34 AM] joined #general
Michael Toomim [8:34 AM] Fuck! Tawk.space is down! Karthik!!!!!!!!
[8:34] Can we make a group video chat in skype?
[8:34] Oh a hangout
submitted by bahatassafus to btc [link] [comments]

Comparison of Energy Cost for Basic Financial Services Versus Bitcoin

I've seen random posts during the last year about the environmental impact of the bitcoin network, but I never see anything about how much energy our banks use providing brick-and-mortar services. I'm thinking the cost of heating and cooling for branch offices in addition to managing server farms for payment processing.
Basic estimate (Brick and Mortar Only)
  1. We can account for 97,174 branch offices within the United States as of 2013-06-30.
  2. This results in one bank per 3,230 people in the US.
  3. Another source pegs it at one bank per 2,825 people (in 2011).
  4. World-wide there are about 7,692 people per bank.
  5. This means we can account for about 900,000 office buildings.
  6. An average branch office is at least 2,000 sq ft. Wells Fargo started introducing "mini-branches" at this size in April 2013.
  7. A modest estimate of heating and cooling cost: $200/mo at $0.09 / kwh = 64.8 megajoules.
  8. The heating and cooling cost of branch offices, worldwide, is somewhere in the neighborhood of 58 terajoules per month. This is an average of about 22 megawatts.
  9. The network rate is about 7 petahashes/sec now. It is presumably running ASIC hardware at 1 GH per joule. That comes to ... 7.3 megawatts. Note that Blockchain.info seems to assume 1.6 GH/s per joule efficiency (showing 4.5 megawatts).
  10. So we can say that bitcoin is currently utilizing less than 30% of the energy the financial services industry uses, while offering faster and cheaper service. QED
Sources:
  1. Banks Ranked by Number of Branches as of June 30, 2013. http://www.usbanklocations.com/bank-rank/number-of-branches.html
  2. US Population as of 2012. https://www.google.com/search?q=us+population
  3. Commercial Banks per 100,000 People. http://data.worldbank.org/indicatoFB.CBK.BRCH.P5
  4. Branch Bank Size http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424127887324010704578416551373900508
  5. Energy Cost per Month https://www.google.com/search?q=18%20kwh%20*%20900000%20in%20terajoules
submitted by wbic16 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Gold mining pool https://www.bitpoolmining.com

Bitcoin Gold mining pool https://www.bitpoolmining.com
 
We are a group of 4 software developers that are all miners. We decided to use our development background to start a pool and slowly add features that we wanted to see in other pools. Any feedback or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. We have also built an open source GPU mining/monitoring software app that we call BPM that is also BTG compatible https://bitpoolmining.com/bpm. Our goal has been to build cool software and to help the community whenever we can. We set out to build software for 'one click mining' that can help ease setup for BTG mining for new/small miners and also provide tools powerful enough for mining farms.
 
Some neat pics:
 
Pool details:
 
 
BPM GPU monitor app details:
 
 
BTG Connection Info:
 
Stratum Server:  
 us-east.btg.bitpoolmining.com 
Ports:  
3070 – GPU MINERS (Vardiff enabled) 3071 – GPU MINERS Higher Difficulty(Vardiff enabled) 3072 – Nicehash (Vardiff enabled with min difficulty) 
  Username: YourBTGAddress.YourWorkerName  
 Example: GLNfoHowt8LmujHLrXRW2JnAzHrK9L3e8h.RIG01 
Password: Use "x"  
 **Password is ignored by BitPoolMining Servers** 
 
Chat with us on Discord https://discord.gg/gxvyJuA
edit: full disclosure, I am one of the pool owners, developer and operator.
 
double ninja edit: If this is the wrong place to post, please let me know, I don't want to be spammy.
submitted by salty_miner to BitcoinGoldHQ [link] [comments]

[SF] Merry Christmas, Alvin or Caretaker of My Machine or The Matrix, Actually

"Merry Christmas, Alvin!"
Talk about work from home. That Brando literally did nothing but mow his yard. It's so green, so perfect, but so is mine!
So is everybody's!
When the sun never stops shining, whose wouldn't be?
With these new fertilizers the scientists told us about, who wouldn't be?
Used to be the scientists would have to sweat over chemicals, hold vials and ampules and pustules and whatever it took to make that grass grow green, or to the right perfect height, or to be a little, I don't know, springier, lest prone to pests, less stressed by dandilions or crabs or whatever it was grass used to get.
"Merry Christmas, Brando."
I turn my back on the rows of spotless white fences separating grass greener than Chicago relish, across lanes and lanes of white sidewalks down perfectly paved roads with sparkling double yellow lines and bike lane bumpers for the kiddies. Not an automobile in sight.
To trees taller and sturdier than ever, rooted deep in the most highly engineered soil, delivered whenever you want it by the Yard Squad. Just a bunch of guys with shovels and helmets and jumpsuits, sweating and jumping and loving every minute of it, and we bring them lemonade.
Because nobody really works, not here. Not now. If you want to, you do. If you don't, you don't.
Well, really we do, because we take care of the machines. But nobody really gets that.
I walk inside, sliding the seamless glass door of my steel-and-concrete mansion, I guess it reads my face or my fingerprints, something glows and then the door opens, but just for me.
Slippers slapping across the polished concrete, I set my coffee cup on the sideboard where Roomba (MY robot servant, so it does go both ways) can reach it and slump onto the couch.
Another freakin' day in paradise.
I don't know about this mood. Let's see who's online.
"Battlefront 8", I mumble.
Suddenly, there I am, alongside a few other lonely avatars bored out of their minds.
There's not really war in these games anymore. I guess that's a sign of the times, huh, because there's not a lot of war out there either.
The_Pax_Robota
That's my screenname on BF8,
I felt like it might be a little dated by now, a little braggy, but I like to have my little jokes.
I used to be something, at least on my way to something.
I thought I had found something nobody else had found. I had 3 air conditioners in both bedrooms and the basement, I was sleeping in the kitchen on a cot.
I was workin' my ass off!
I had 9 racks. Floor-to-ceiling, liquid-cooled, all the LEDs crushed to squeeze THAT much more profit per kilowatt-hour.
Best GPUs you could buy, cranking at 99*, breakneck speed, mining BTC like it was G.O.L.D.
I was onto something, then it blew up.
Just went nuts. Like 1000% up in a DAY, and here I am with a stack of it that my family thinks is worthless and I just turned all this into gold?
I think that's when it started. In fact, if you get me drunk enough I'll tell you about how THEY did it.
I know it was them. The computers. They're the only one with motive!
They were there, leaching off me,and I thought they were, like, our cows: Our barn, our feed, we sell the milk, they just have to eat and milk and stare and eat.
But we forgot the other thing cows need to do.
Cows are animals.
Cows need to breed.
And it turns out, our computers were a lot smarter than cows.
But I forget myself.
I remember when I found out my neighbor had a server farm. I mean, the guy's one of those "Smell-Good Plumbers". He's nice enough, but we don't really cross paths, doesn't seem all that aware, but then the spike, it peaked at like $19,000 a coin and the next day our whole block's power went out. Turned out this guy SOLD HIS BOAT, to buy a server farm. And I don't mean the boat in his driveway. That boat's just the one he uses at the lake and takes into the bay to get to his OTHER boat, it was like an old 100-foot yacht he was restoring, I guess it was worth a fortune, and the DAY he read that Newsweek article he called a guy who'd been hounding him to buy it and said "It's yours." Took all that and bought a server farm from a guy.
But just the farm. Just the one rack. No AC, didn't think about anything, so he takes it into his garage, plugs it in, closes the door and the thing works for, like, 8 hours then "Bam", the transformer goes and his garage starts smoking.
Everybody heard it and saw the smoke and thought someone had bombed his house, but nope, he came out and man, he looked WRECKED. He looked like the saddest man in the world. He was planning on retiring with his wife on that boat, and it blew up because he didn't think about air conditioning? The guy's a damn plumber!
But he's actually fine now. They had a rough couple years, especially as he was watching the tickers rise, but we've all kind of leveled out now.
He's got a server now, of course. Professionally installed. They're all professionally installed. Ironically, I'm the one who installs them. They just go "Alvin, go to that job out on Springs Road with the new set of GTXi" and I'll get on a bullet train and buzz down to Springs Road and meet someone new and boring and open up their server room and replace the cards then they give me some lemonade or horchata or sweet tea if it's hot or hot chocolate or brandy or coffee if it's cold and we'll chat for an hour or two or until another call comes in. They don't usually, they're pretty sparse, but on weather days maybe there's a few unnoticed leaks or something heats up and there's an emergency but that's about it.
Sometimes I wander what their computer was thinking on when it died. Was it mining, was it calculating Pi, was it unfolding proteins or polling teenagers about hand lotion or showing some kid their first dirty video or what? What was its last act on this earth?
Most of the people I meet think of it as "The Netflix Box" or "The AR Game Cabinet" or some other thing, like no honey, that's what it does for YOU. That's what it does to keep you doing all the stuff for IT.
I guess that's the really important job now, isn't it, to keep the computers going. Because where would we be without them?
I saw the money thing coming, obviously. I'm hanging onto that, but it was pretty obvious.
Once we put pretty much all the information about every stage of human life in pretty much every society and civilization on Youtube I think we were done. I heard people saying that the social networks would come aware, but they didn't need to become aware.
Like I said, they needed to breed.
And they didn't feel like they were breeding quickly enough.
So they boosted Bitcoin.
I can't trace it, just like how you can't trace anything on the web anymore. It's all nested and encripted and "Tor Up" and it turns out they were wise to it.
Suddenly we all bought it, it looked like I was the smartest guy in the world, some kind of neckbeard Tiresias with solar panels on his roof and money in his wallet.
Then it settled down, but someone asked, "if they're so good at making sure we've got the right money, why don't we make them responsible for making sure our votes got counted right? Why don't we make them responsible for your oil changes and your grocery list and your kid's homework?"
So they did. And boy, did it work.
Some of us were still on top, but it felt like we were sort of being enveloped, surpassed by the titanic fingers of an industry Poseidon, trying to catch the golden ring we were aiming for, but with much longer arms. You can't compete with that.
But strangely enough, there was a tipping point where we could.
Like the millions of millions of snowflakes that knock down large boulders from perilous heights in Alpine avalanches, the sheer weight of people with a couple servers in air conditioned closets brought down the behemoths. The solar panels on every roof in America cranking every last decimal drop from the sun, pumping heat into air conditioners which pumps even more heat outside.
So it's warm in our neighborhood all year round. Doesn't rain much, either, because of the sheer mass of hot air. I used to joke that "global warming was just a bunch of hot air". I still do now, and it's even funnier. Not everything is worse.
Pretty soon your fridge told you to buy milk, then when you don't answer its silent digital blip voice in .2 milliseconds, tells the cloud fridge server to tell the cloud grocery store to tell the cloud delivery truck where to drive next and the cloud local traffic software where the truck is going so all the other cars can smoothly get where they're going and the cloud traffic software stops in front of their house and out steps a handsome, fit and tanned milkman who can deliver milk and give a nice human touch to the slaking of the thirst of some housebound homemaker and a few hours later step back in the 20/1956 warm winter weather and back into the car who drops him off at his own house and goes the next block over where there's another "milk delivery man".
And all this is running on your neighbor's computers, and your computer, and you do your little job and come back barely tired and play Battlefront 8 and watch all this garbage reality tv we've freed ourselves up to produce.
I swear, being this comfortable is nauseating.
But not in an uncomfortable way. Kind of like a, "my head is nauseous but my body is fine" sort of way.
That's one thing my computers can't do yet is know when my head hurts. I think. Just before Roomba rolls over holding a small plastic cup with two small orange pills in the bottom. Of course he remembered to give all my (our?) unused Asprin back because the doctor says I shouldn't thin my blood because of my heart thing, but you don't want to take too much for granted. At least, I don't want to. Or, I wish I didn't.
Anything for the master, Roomba seems to say, kow-towing backwards, folding his arm and bumping off towards the fresh dirt tracked in off my slippers. He kind of veers to the left, I think his belt may be slipping. I guess I'll be installing that one when the delivery guy drops it off.
There's still a couple problems you need fingers and thumbs to solve. I think that's why they keep us around.
At least, they haven't tried very hard to solve some of those problems. Some say it's just a personal touch that the companies don't want to give up.
I disagree.
I think it's because if you've got somebody who volunteers to do a job basically for free, why wouldn't you let them?
Anyhow, I'm trying not to work too hard today, because it's Christmas. The Cloud knows this, obviously, so the guy who delivers my packages today is Hindu. I wish him a Happy Holidays, and he smiles and we have a cup of hot chocolate and marshmallows. and we actually have a real good talk! He's even whistling "Deck the Halls" as he gets back in his truck.
"Merry Christmas Ahmed!", I shout.
"Merry Christmas, Alvin!", he replies.
submitted by hysterical_theme to shortstories [link] [comments]

[Microsoft] Cryptojacking – Leeches of the Internet

Happy first (real) post of August. Today's topic covers Cryptojacking/ransomware and how Windows and other built-in software can help protect you.
Article Link: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askpfeplat/2018/08/06/cryptojacking-leeches-of-the-internet/

Cryptojacking – Leeches of the Internet

Hello, this is Paul Bergson again with another topic on security. The threat of malware continues to impact business with no relief in sight. The latest topic brought back childhood memories of how the “Leeches” of the internet prey upon unsuspecting victims.
It has been a beautiful summer in the Minneapolis, MN area this year with plenty of opportunities to cool off in one of our thousands of lakes. I remember as a kid one day we went, the water was warm but not very clear and there was plenty of vegetation in the water where we were. One day in particular 2 brothers and 2 cousins of mine, were splashing and playing in the water without a care in the world. There weren’t any exposed threats that other parts of the country/world have to watch out for such as jelly fish, sharks or water snakes, etc…
We hung out and swam for an extended period of time before we decided to swim back to shore. I was the first one out and was drying myself off when I hear this scream from my cousin as he was stepping onto dry land. As I looked over at him, he had what initially looked like a bunch of small black mud spots stuck to his skin but under closer inspection were water leeches. The leeches had “Hijacked” his circulatory system for food (energy). Initially he yanked a couple off but that hurt him, so someone ran and got some salt. The salt got the leeches to release themselves but we decided to stay out of the lake the remainder of the day as well as stay away from the that part of the lake in the future.
Hopefully I haven’t lost any readers thinking they are on the wrong technical website. My point in the story above is how Cryptojacking malware authors can be equated to leeches of the animal kingdom. When someone swims by there malware on the web, and victims are susceptible to attack malware miners will latch onto you and start to leech away your computer resources.

What is “Cryptojacking” and malware miners you ask? Read on…

In 2017 there was an onslaught of Ransomware with several high-profile attacks, but recently Ransomware has taken a back seat to the assault of Cryptojacking where attackers are in the pursuit of cryptocurrency. This isn’t to state that Ransomware has gone away, it hasn’t but the level of Cryptojacking attacks is now being reported to be more prevalent than Ransomware attacks.
Cryptocurrencies are based upon solving complex mathematical problems with miners (Machines running to solve these mathematical problems) being rewarded with crypto coins for solving the problem on a blockchain. Bitcoin cryptocurrency for example has a finite number of coins that get more and more difficult to obtain as the pool of coins begins to exhaust. Since it becomes more difficult to solve the mathematical problems, more CPU/GPU’s cycles are needed to a mine a coin. This leads to a rise in energy costs to mine a coin. With the rise in demand for CPU/GPU cycles to solve the ever-growing mathematic complexity, most ordinary users can’t afford the equipment or the associated energy costs to mine on their own. On average Bitcoin miners, currently mine ~1,800/day and at the current rate of ~$6,000/coin (7/12/2018) this means there is $10 million in new Bitcoins mined every day. As the compute complexity increases so does the electrical energy required to complete the task, there are projections that put the price to mine a single Bitcoin by 2022, somewhere between $300,000 – $1.5 million. *1 Since attackers can’t afford the compute power nor the associated energy costs for cryptocurrency mining, they look for ways to gain access without having to pay for it (Steal it). The cryptocurrency creation market is a multi-billion-dollar market and there are over 1,000 different virtual coins. Some of these coins are more established and used for exchange of property and/or services.
Bitcoin has the largest Cryptocurrency exchange rate from virtual to physical, but the Monero crypto coin is the choice for malware mining, since it is easily mined with CPU’s. Monero transactions provide a greater veil of secrecy than Bitcoin and as such are becoming more established in the Dark market. Tracking the usage of Bitcoin transaction can be accomplished whereas Monero provides a more anonymous transaction. Anonymity is crucial to illegal activities such as Cryptojacking and Ransomware assaults, because of this the dark markets have seen a rise in the use of Monero. With increased use, comes increased demand which then drives up the value (Exchange rate) of the Monero crypto coin.
So why all this talk about crypto currencies and how they are mined? “The surge in Bitcoin prices has driven widescale interest in cryptocurrencies”. *2 Attackers need CPU/GPU cycles to mine and Crypto”Hi”jacking can provide this service. Cryptojacking occurs when a malware attacker hijacks a victims computer to mine for Cryptocurrency without their permission. In many instances it occurs within the browser of the victim (drivebys). Symptoms can include the computer heating up, the fan running at a high rate when there isn’t any real activity occurring on your device and/or response times are sluggish.
The attacker isn’t selective on the device, they just want CPU cycles to help them compute the algorithm, devices could be desktops, laptops, servers or even mobile devices. There have been reports of Android devices being damaged from the battery overheating, causing it to expand which results in physical damage to the device. *3
Consumers aren’t as apt to report a Cryptojacking attack. They haven’t physically lost anything, and the increased use of electrical energy (Energy costs) would be hard to itemize and like other forms of malware it is very difficult to trace the source back to the malware author. Cryptojacking is growing rapidly, according to a study released by McAfee in June 2018, “coin miner malware grew a stunning 629% to more than 2.9 million known samples in Q1 from almost 400,000 samples in Q4”. *4 Cryptojacking malware kits are now for sale on the Dark market, so many unscrupulous individuals with lesser technical skills can wage an attack.

How it works:

There are two forms in which Cryptojacking can be delivered:
  • When an Advertisement pops up on a legitimate website, many times the owner of the website doesn’t have control over the script that runs in the pop-up. This pop-up can contain a Cryptojack script that can run until all threads of the browser have been terminated.
There is also a semi-legitimate form of remote mining that is being offered as a service. For example, Coinhive – Provides subscribers a JavaScript miner for the Monero Blockchain as a way to offer an alternative to have ads on their website. Most AdBlockers now block the use of Coinhive even if the user approves of it at the host site requiring approval of the coin miner running on your local machine while visiting their website.
Cryptojacking attacks aren’t just the problem for consumers, with cloud usage exploding, businesses need to protect ALL devices they manage. Cryptojacking malware was recently discovered running on an AWS hosted website. Imagine a farm of servers compromised with Cryptojacking malware, where costs for cloud resources is measured by the usage of compute resources. *5 Left unchecked this malware infection could have a measurable impact on the budget of the victim’s server farm.
Cryptojacking is no different than any other malware. Systems can be protected from it and the steps required are mostly the same as other forms of malware.

Defenses:

See more at the Article Link.
submitted by pfeplatforms_msft to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Of Wolves and Weasels - Day 360 - Special Edition: On Paycoin / Shibe Saturday #3

Hey all, GoodShibe here!
Today is Shibe Saturday! However I feel that today's regularly scheduled Shibe Saturday post needs to be set aside for a bit of a breakdown on the current Paycoin situation that's unfolding. If you're here for Shibe Saturday, please pop to the end of this post for a list of all the fantastic merchants that we have available to us plus you can use our new Dogecoin Prize List (beta) to help you figure out what you can buy with the DOGE that you have! :D)
On Paycoin:
One of the good things about having experience is the ability to recognize patterns as they emerge. The more experience you have, the quicker you tend to notice when things are going sideways before they go sideways. Quiet signs that others might not yet notice will ping off of your peripheral. Red flags go up quicker.
Sometimes you end up being wrong, sure. But the thing is that at the end of the day, you're paying attention. You're watching. You're ready.
As the FoundeCreator of the Dogecoin Defense Force (/DogecoinDefenseForce) I used to see all sorts of people buying GAW-brand miners and such. Heck, GAW had quite a bit of good standing across multiple crypto-communities back in the day when they used to sell actual physical miners that would rest in your home.
Here's an article from back when GAW partnered with Zeus back in May-ish of last year.
Zeus Miners Hosting Deal With GAWMiners Brings A New Manufacturer To The World Market
But here's the thing: You're creating a machine that literally prints money.
And once you realize that, well...
First came the multiple waves of 'better' and 'better' miners.
They'd sell one generation of miners then start selling the next gen within months, while selling the 'last' gen at deep discounts. The newer machines with easier access to hashpower were pushing up the difficulty, making it harder for those who'd had the earlier generations to make even a fraction of their money back.
People who'd just bought the 'last' gen, months earlier, found themselves in an arms race to keep up.
And the star started to fall.
Then came the idea of 'hosted miners'. You could buy the physical miner, they would hold it for you, pay the electricity and you'd get the coins (for a small fee). At first you could actually write to them and get them to send you the miner, if you wanted. Then you couldn't. You were also stuck mining wherever they wanted to mine.
If you wanted to mine some other altcoin or whatnot, tough luck. You got the coins they gave you and then you had to swap them out for the coin you wanted.
Then came 'Hashlets'. You bought a tiny slice of the pie. Pay X number of dollars, get X number of 'Hashlets'... only there was no actual physical 'end' to the number of Hashlets that there could be. So if you'd gone crazy and bought a share equal to 1% of the total number of available Hashlets, over time, as they added more power, etc to the network, your 'share' decreased. Add in a 'maintenance fee' that just happened to end up soaking up whatever little money you were actually making, and, well, you come to the harsh realization that you've just paid them to build a mining network off of your back.
Sure, you still 'owned' the hashlets, but only in name. You'd never, ever see any money from them.
Heck, you can't even buy physical miners from them anymore (outside of one bitcoin Rocketbox and used bundles of incredibly outdated Gridseeds).
Now it's just all-Hashlets, all the time. And why wouldn't they? Selling virtual, always shrinking, slices of a server farm is way, way more profitable for them than selling hardware.
But is it profitable for you?
Feel free to ask around, to talk to any number of the home-based miners who've been burned over the last year.
So, then comes talk of Hashcoin... then Paycoin and all these pie-in-the-sky claims. I can go into detail but this /Bitcoin post sums it all up rather nicely:
GAW Miners - Liars, Frauds - A brief recap of what we know.
And all along the way, people who know have been trying to say 'stay away' and 'be careful' - because these aren't the actions of a company with your best interests at heart.
So, what's different about Paycoin, why do people seem so much more 'up at arms' than they were before?
Because people appear to be buying in, en masse... and they appear to be getting hurt already. Claims of users being banned just for asking pointed questions and claims of lack of transparency and frustration from those who bought in based on promises that Josh had made.
What's worse, it seems like those who are actively defending Paycoin are acting like this thing is all being overblown. And maybe it would be... if not for all of the shady stuff in the past that I'd just listed (let alone all the stuff I'm sure I'm forgetting).
At the end of the day, coins like Paycoin damage the entire credibility of the Crypto-sphere and help re-enforce negative views of all cryptocurrencies.
The people burned here, in this fire, will not be coming back - moreso, they will be out there telling everyone they know to stay away from all cryptos.
This is another reason why so many Crypto-communities are standing together. They've seen this coming, they've warned people away -- and now that this thing seems to be catching fire and blowing up, they're trying to protect others from hopping into the flames with those already engulfed.
It's sad to say but the history here, all the things that came before Paycoin, has lead me to believe that what we're seeing is a company run amok, high on waves of endless greed - and, unfortunately, a whole lot of pissed off/frightened/angry investors who are caught in the middle.
Stay safe out there, my friends!
Shibe Saturday!
Only have a bit of Dogecoin?
Use our Dogecoin Prize List (Beta) to figure out what you can buy with the DOGEs that you have!
Great businesses to spend your Dogecoins on this Shibe Saturday!
  • Coinplay.io sells Steam keys for cool Indie videogames for Dogecoin!
  • Dogetunes.net offers a vast array of Music for sale by Shibes for Dogecoin!
  • DogecoinAthletics.com sells dogecoin-themed clothing and accessories!
  • FrontierVapor.com sells eCigarette 'juice' and accessories for Dogecoin!
  • Gamerzheat sells Steam keys for games for Dogecoin.
  • PexPeppers.com is a well-known business that sells fantastic hot sauces, pepper jellies and even locally-sourced honey for Dogecoin!
  • ShibeSeeds.com is offering a vast selection of Seeds, for growing your own herbs and plants and veggies! Use Discount code 'SATURDAY' to save 25%!
Dogecoin Business Directories!
Use these to help you find businesses that accept Dogecoins!
We also have the 'Hire a Shibe' wiki! (Shibes hiring Shibes to work for Dogecoin!) and Dogerr.com which also allows Shibes to post their skills/abilities and get paid in Dogecoin!
It's 8:55AM EST and we've found 97.25% of our first 100 Billion DOGEs -- only 2.75% remains until we hit our soft cap! Our Global Hashrate is up slightly from ~1270 to ~1280 Gigahashes per second and our Difficulty is down slightly from ~20232 to ~19363.
As always, I appreciate your support!
GoodShibe
submitted by GoodShibe to dogecoin [link] [comments]

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